How to Get Rid of Yellow Stains From Cat Vomit

A few basic household supplies are all you need to remove cat vomit stains.

A few basic household supplies are all you need to remove cat vomit stains.

When cats throw up, their vomit is frequently tinged with yellow bile. Vomit can quickly leave bright stains that are difficult to remove, and providing proper medical care to your cat can delay stain removal and make removal more difficult. However, there are several ways to effectively remove vomit stains.

Remove the vomit immediately. The longer the vomit sits on the carpet, the worse the stain will be. If you can't remove the vomit immediately, use absorbent paper towels to soak up as much of the stain as possible. Don't rub the stain with the towels, as this can rub the stain farther into the fibers of the stained area.

Apply an enzyme-based stain remover to the affected area. Use a toothbrush or carpet brush to rub the remover into the stain. Allow the stain remover to soak into the stain for 10 to 15 minutes or according to the package directions. Soak up the remaining stain remover with paper towels and then vacuum the affected area.

Mix one part white vinegar to eight parts water in a bucket or spray bottle. Spray onto the stain and allow it to set for one to two minutes. Then blot up the remaining vinegar with absorbent paper towels until no more moisture comes up. Vinegar helps to remove lingering stains and will also minimize odor.

Spray the affected area with a pet odor remover. Pets often soil areas that they have previously vomited or urinated on, and they can smell vomit even after the scent is no longer detectable to people.

Items you will need

  • Paper towels
  • Enzyme-based stain remover
  • Toothbrush or carpet brush
  • Vacuum
  • Vinegar
  • Bucket or spray bottle
  • Pet odor remover

Tip

  • If the stain is old or very discolored, repeat the stain removal steps until it is gone.
 

References

  • Handy Household Hints from Heloise; Heloise
  • How to Clean Just About Anything for Next to Nothing; Alisa Mayne, et al.

About the Author

Brenna Davis is a professional writer who covers parenting, pets, health and legal topics. Her articles have appeared in a variety of newspapers and magazines as well as on websites. She is a court-appointed special advocate and is certified in crisis counseling and child and infant nutrition. She holds degrees in developmental psychology and philosophy from Georgia State University.

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