How to Remove Dog Urine Stains From Oak Flooring

by Sandra Ketcham, Demand Media
    An accident doesn't mean your oak floor is ruined.

    An accident doesn't mean your oak floor is ruined.

    No matter how well trained your pooch is, an accident is bound to happen. Finding a urine stain isn't cause for panic, even if it's right in the middle of your beautiful oak floor. Most dog urine stains are removable, but proceed carefully to prevent damaging your floor.

    Items you will need

    • Paper towels
    • Baking soda
    • Light-colored towel
    • Hydrogen peroxide
    • Plastic wrap
    • White vinegar
    • Sandpaper

    Step 1

    Place several layers of paper towels over fresh dog urine stains. The paper will soak up as much urine as possible. Continue replacing the towels until all the moisture is out of the wood.

    Step 2

    Sprinkle baking soda over the entire stain and allow it to sit in place overnight. While this won't help remove old stains, it will lighten recent stains and will help absorb odor.

    Step 3

    Vacuum the baking soda with an attachment designed for wood floors. Do not use a rotating brush. Be careful not to scratch the wood.

    Step 4

    Dampen a light-colored towel or cotton ball with hydrogen peroxide. Dab a very small spot on your oak floor. After a few hours, check this test spot to see how it responded to the peroxide. If no major bleaching or damage occurs, proceed to the next step.

    Step 5

    Soak the light-colored towel in the peroxide and place it on top of the urine stain. Cover the towel with plastic wrap and let it sit overnight.

    Step 6

    Remove the plastic wrap and towel and wipe the stain with a mixture of equal parts water and white vinegar. Dry with a clean towel.

    Step 7

    Sand the oak flooring to remove any remaining stain, and apply a coat of wood stain to match the rest of your floor. It's best to use sandpaper instead of a power sander because you'll have more control over the small area.

    Warning

    • Bleach can lighten urine stains too much or damage wood floors.

    About the Author

    Sandra Ketcham has nearly two decades of experience writing and editing for major websites and magazines. Her work appears in numerous web and print publications, including "The Atlanta Journal-Constitution," "The Tampa Bay Times," Visit Florida, "USA Today," AOL's Gadling and "Kraze Magazine."

    Photo Credits

    • David De Lossy/Photodisc/Getty Images