Dog Kennel Run Ideas

A dog run is a functional substitute for a fully-fenced yard, but not all kennel runs are created equal. Some runs are better suited for petite pups, while others are ideal for larger breeds. Consider your dog’s size and activity level before building a run.

Your Dog

Kennel runs are designed to let Fido romp and play in the great outdoors, and you must know your pup well to build a safe run. Placid, laid-back pups do just fine in smaller runs, while rambunctious Rovers need more space to burn off all that energy. Size is another necessary consideration; the taller the dog, the taller the fence must be. Playful pups also need more room to frolic than lazy dogs, so consider increasing the size of the run for younger, more active dogs.

Fencing Choices

The right fencing can make or break your dog run. Chain-link dog kennels are popular, and for good reason; chain link is strong, functional and not too unsightly. This handy wire fencing also comes in a range of heights to keep both small and big dogs safely contained. Another common choice, especially in kennel runs sold in stores, is heavy woven-wire panels. These panels come pre-assembled and are simple to set up with a few tools, making them popular for owners who are always on the go. Wood is less common than wire runs but still a sturdy choice for owners with a flair for fancy fences.

Footing

The floor of your run is just as important as the fence. Dirt is a logical choice that works well in dry weather but will leave your pup a muddy mess after even a short sprinkle. Grass is another choice for many owners, although the constant wear and tear of puppy feet may damage the turf. Gravel is also used for kennel runs, due to its low cost and easy cleanup. Concrete is popular because it is easy to clean, but you must provide your pup with a soft, comfortable bed.

Housing Solutions

Provide your pup with a home away from home inside his run. A simple doghouse will keep him warm and dry in cold weather, and shady and cool during a heat wave. The house doesn’t have to be anything fancy; a small shelter with sturdy walls and a room is enough to protect your furry friend. Toss a bed or blanket inside and your pooch will rest comfortably after a romp in his new kennel run.

 

About the Author

Louise Lawson has been a published author and editor for more than 10 years. Lawson specializes in pet and food-related articles, utilizing her 15 years as a sous chef and as a dog breeder, handler and trainer to produce pieces for online and print publications.