How to Clean Cat Urine From Suede

by Sarah Dray, Demand Media
    Kitty looking innocent? Don't trust him.

    Kitty looking innocent? Don't trust him.

    Suede and cats don't mix. Unfortunately, kitty doesn't always get that, and you might find your new boots or jacket beyond repair. After you're done screaming -- to yourself, to the cat, to the world -- get to work. The sooner you clean suede, the better the results.

    Step 1

    Blot the area to soak up remaining urine. A paper towel is best, but toilet paper or a clean cloth will work. Resist the temptation to scrub -- it will only spread the urine over a larger area. Repeat until you get the area as dry as possible.

    Step 2

    Use baking soda if you can't get all the urine out because it's been absorbed. This is often the case with items like a suede-covered couch or pillow, whereby the urine can go deeper into the material because it's thicker. Sprinkle some baking soda after patting the area dry. Wait for a few minutes so the powder absorbs some of the moisture. Then vacuum everything.

    Step 3

    Choose your cleaning weapon. Your best option is an enzymatic pet-odor removal product, which you can find at pet stores and some supermarkets. Read the label of the brand you buy. Some will tell you to spray the area and let it dry overnight, while others require that you spray and blot. These products will not only clean the suede but also get rid of the smell by destroying the enzymes present in urine. Can't find it or afford it? Try some mild dish-washing soap in the meantime. Using a wet sponge and some soap, blot the area where the urine is. Rinse using a clean sponge and water, then blot dry with a paper towel.

    Step 4

    Repeat the process until the smell is gone. If you can still smell the urine, there's something left, even if you can't see a stain anymore. Let the suede dry completely overnight between cleanings.

    Tip

    • Stay away from ammonia-based cleaners. Cats love the smell of ammonia -- it actually smells like urine to them -- and will come running back to pee right on the same place again.

    About the Author

    Sarah Dray has been writing since 1996. She specializes in health, wellness and travel topics and has credits in various publications including "Woman's Day," "Marie Claire," "Adirondack Life" and "Self." She is also a seasoned independent traveler and a certified personal trainer and nutrition consultant. Dray is pursuing a criminal justice degree at Penn Foster College.

    Photo Credits

    • Hemera Technologies/AbleStock.com/Getty Images