What Are the Most Vocal Cats?

by Louise Lawson, Demand Media
    The Siamese is by far one of the most vocal cat breeds.

    The Siamese is by far one of the most vocal cat breeds.

    Vocalization in cats is akin to barking in dogs; they often meow to say hello or tell us when they need food, want to be let outside, or just want to be petted. However, some breeds are naturally vocal and meow for no apparent reason. Don't let their tendency to vocalize deter you from these breeds. Most make extremely good house pets due to their gentle dispositions and good-natured personalities.

    Siamese

    One of the most recognizable of all cat breeds, the Siamese is also one of the most vocal. Originally exported from Thailand in the late 19th century, the distinctive look and sound of the Siamese won them popularity around the world. Siamese cats have a long lifespan, often living for more than 15 years. These long, graceful cats are famous for their light coats and dark, bold masks and temperamental personalities. The Siamese voice is loud, raspy, and insistent to the point of irritation for those not familiar with the breed’s vocal tendencies.

    Burmese

    The Burmese is another highly vocal breed. The breed originated in the mid-20th century and is the product of a crossbreeding between a male Siamese and a female imported from Burma. This Siamese influence almost certainly contributes to the Burmese vocal nature. Burmese cats have calm dispositions, making them good companions for both adults and children. They also exercise themselves, and do well in either a house or an apartment.

    Peterbald

    As its name states, the Peterbald is indeed a bald breed. This virtually hairless breed lacks the fur of most breeds, but may be covered in short, fine down. The Peterbald originated in the 1990s in the Don River area of Russia, and is the result of a cross between a Don Sphinx and an Oriental Shorthair. Not as vocal as the Siamese or Burmese, this cat still loves to talk. The Peterbald’s voice isn’t as rough or raspy as that of oriental breeds, but they can be loud and demanding when they want attention.

    Japanese Bobtail

    The Japanese Bobtail is one of the oldest recorded breeds in the world. With documentation dating back more than 1,000 years, this vocal cat has long been considered a good luck charm in Japan. This breed comes in both long and short-haired varieties and often has small patches of color over mostly-white fur. A natural breed with short, stubby tails, the Japanese Bobtail enjoys a larger vocabulary than other breeds. It loves to meow and chirp, and gets along well with both pets and people.

    About the Author

    Louise Lawson has been a published author and editor for more than 10 years. Lawson specializes in pet and food-related articles, utilizing her 15 years as a sous chef and as a dog breeder, handler and trainer to produce pieces for online and print publications.

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