Types of Haircuts for Yorkies

The Yorkshire terrier's long locks aren't easy to maintain.

The Yorkshire terrier's long locks aren't easy to maintain.

Yorkshire terrier hair is naturally long and silky. The tan and silver locks are known to drag the floor if left uncut. The skirted look is beautiful as long as it's properly managed. But it's a lot easier to cut the Yorkie's hair in one of a few simple-to-maintain styles.

Schnauzer Cut

The Schnauzer cut is a popular style for Yorkies; it's a stylish, low-maintence cut. The dog's back and a portion of the legs are shaved very short with clippers -- similar to a buzz cut. The face is left longer, although trimmed to frame the face. The feet are usually left with a bit of length. Modified versions of this cut have the facial hair either longer or shorter than that of the typical Schnauzer cut.

The Westie Cut

The Westie cut is a compromise for owners who love the long look but want something more manageable. The dog's fur is cut to approximately 1 inch from the floor and kept trimmed neatly everywhere else. The beard area is kept rounded around the mouth. Enough fur is left on the top of the dog's head for a topknot, a signature Yorkie look that involves tying the hair on the top of the head in a ponytail.

The Puppy Cut

The "puppy" cut is perfect for a busy owner with an active dog. The whole coat is cut short but not shaved, the fur left approximately 1 to 2 inches long in all areas, including the face. You may opt to keep the top of the hair long enough to accommodate a topknot. The square puppy cut, which is a variation, entails shaving the dog's back and trimming the hair around the face into a boxed shape.

The Chinese Crested Cut

The Chinese crested cut requires more upkeep than shorter styles since the hair is kept long in many places. The back is shaved very short, while the leg hair is kept long and flowing. The coat is trimmed to a manageable length but may still touch the floor. The face is framed with long hair trimmed to the desired length, but not touching the floor -- it is typically trimmed to hang halfway to the dog's feet.

 

About the Author

Jennifer Oster holds a Bachelor of Arts in social sciences from Louisiana State University and is also a certified lactation counselor. An expert in the field of infant and maternal nutrition, she began writing professionally in 2005 and has been featured in many nationally acclaimed magazines.

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