Is Tresaderm for Cats Used for Ear Mites?

by Susan Paretts, Demand Media Google
    Tresaderm helps to rid those kitty ears of mites.

    Tresaderm helps to rid those kitty ears of mites.

    Tresaderm is a type of medication that must be prescribed by your veterinarian to treat ear mites in your kitty. This topical medication is a liquid that is used not only to rid your furbaby of her ear mites, but to treat any bacterial or fungal infections as well.

    Ingredients

    Tresaderm is a topical liquid that contains a combination of three main active ingredients. These ingredients are thiabendazole, dexamethasone and neomycin sulfate solution, according to Drugs.com. Thiabendazole is the main component of Tresaderm and is used to kill ear mites and treat fungal infections of the ears. Dexamethasone is a cortecosteroid medication that helps to relieve inflammation and irritation. Neomycin sulfate is an antibacterial component that kills bacteria in the ears to treat infections caused by the mites or by your kitty's scratching. Together, these medications rid your kitty of mites, the itching they cause and any possible infections.

    Diagnosis

    If you suspect that your kitty is suffering from an ear mite infestation, visit your veterinarian for a proper diagnosis. Ear mites are microscopic parasites that live in your furry friend's ears, feeding on the wax and oils of the ears. They cause intense itching and redness and in severe cases can result in ear infections or hearing loss. Your vet will be able to take a swab of the inside of your kitty's ears and see if there are any mites present by viewing the material collected under a microscope. If there are mites present, he will prescribe medication for your kitty, which may include Tresaderm. Most veterinarians sell this medication in the office, so you should be able to start treatment immediately.

    Usage

    Tresaderm must be refrigerated. Your veterinarian will recommend a dosage schedule for your kitty, usually between 5 and 15 drops in each ear, twice daily, according to PetPlace. Treatment usually lasts about 7 days, after which your furry friend's mites should be gone, along with any fungal or bacterial infections. Tresaderm comes in a dropper-style plastic bottle so you can more easily place the drops inside the ear canal. Place the tip of the bottle just inside the ear canal and squeeze the bottle gently between your fingers to expel each drop. Take care to aim the drops within the ears and not near your little one's eyes. If you have any questions, have your vet show you the proper way to apply the drops.

    Squirmy Kitty

    Your kitty may not enjoy the application of Tresaderm drops inside her ears, especially because the drops are cold. Give your kitty a treat before and after application of the ear drops to keep her as calm as possible during each dosing. This also makes her look forward to dosing times, rather than running off and hiding when she sees you with the bottle. Hold your little one still with one hand and apply the drops with your other, so she can't squirm out of your grasp. If possible, have someone else hold her in place while you apply the drops.

    Considerations

    Tresaderm is a medication commonly prescribed to treat ear mites in both cats and kittens, but there are other medications available that your vet may choose to prescribe instead of, or in addition to, this medication. Your vet may apply a product directly into the ear canal that will eradicate the mites in one use or recommend the use of a topical flea-preventative to kill the mites, according to Veterinary Partner. Whatever the case, be sure to follow your vet's advice and dosing recommendations. Stopping treatment early or failing to give the proper dose of Tresaderm won't kill the mites and may leave your little one with an ear infection.

    About the Author

    Based in Las Vegas, Susan Paretts has been writing since 1998. She writes about many subjects including pets, crafts, television, shopping and going green. Her articles, short stories and reviews have appeared in "The Southern California Anthology" and on Epinions. Paretts holds a Master of Professional Writing from the University of Southern California.

    Photo Credits

    • Siamese cat image by Victoria Schaad from Fotolia.com