Tips For How to Groom Hair on the Face of a Shih Tzu Dog

by Amanda Maddox, Demand Media
    Grooming your Shih Tzu brings you closer together.

    Grooming your Shih Tzu brings you closer together.

    The long, silky coat the Shih Tzu is known for requires a great deal of grooming. Part of the Shih Tzu grooming process involves cleaning the face and eyes. When you know what you're doing, cleaning and trimming your pooch’s face is quick and simple.

    Items you will need

    • Eye cleaning cloths
    • Shampoo
    • Pin brush
    • Comb
    • Blunt-end scissors

    Step 1

    Clean your Shih Tzu’s eyes at least once a week. Over-the-counter eye cleaning cloths -- available at your local pet store or from an online retailer -- provide a simple, convenient means of removing the tear stains that often occur because of blocked ducts in their large eyes. Use a cotton ball and warm water to remove stubborn stains.

    Step 2

    Wash the hair on your fuzzy pup's face. Use a gentle shampoo that will not burn your baby's eyes or cause irritation. Rinse the face completely and pat it dry with a towel -- do not rub to dry. This may cause the fine hair of the Shih Tzu to mat or tangle.

    Step 3

    Brush the long and short hair on your Shih Tzu’s face with a pin brush that has no balls on the ends. The balls may cause matting and pull the hair out. Comb any mats left in her hair. Work from the ends of the hair toward the skin when removing mats.

    Step 4

    Trim facial hair and hair around the eyes with a pair of blunt-end scissors. Hold the hair out from the skin and trim the end off. Your personal preference should dictate the length you leave the facial hair. If you want a mustache look, cut the hair to about 1 inch around your dog’s nose and cheeks. For longer coats, blend the facial hair, including the eyebrows, into the coat.

    Tip

    • Look at pictures of Shih Tzus to get an idea of how you want your pup to look, since several cuts are available.

    Warnings

    • If your Shih Tzu has a heavy, odorous discharge around her eyes, contact your vet. It may be a red yeast infection that requires treatment.
    • Exercise caution when trimming around the eyes.

    About the Author

    Amanda Maddox began writing professionally in 2007. Her work appears on various websites focusing on topics about medical billing, coding, real estate, insurance, accounting and business. Maddox has her insurance and real estate licenses and holds an Associate of Applied Science in accounting and business administration from Wallace State Community College.

    Photo Credits

    • Jupiterimages/Brand X Pictures/Getty Images