Things to Know About a Yorkie Puppy

This cute pooch has no problems asking for attention.

This cute pooch has no problems asking for attention.

Don't underestimate the Yorkie's size by the pitter-patter of their tiny feet and their petite body capable of fitting inside a purse. This is a big dog trapped inside a small body. Buyers beware -- Yorkie puppies can be irresistibly cute and may melt your heart into a million pieces.

Peeing Machines

Make sure you stock up with plenty of puppy pads and arm yourself with loads of patience, as this breed is not the easiest to house break. Equipped with tiny bladders and a reluctance to get wet or cold, Yorkies indeed make it to the top list of most difficult breeds to potty train. If you live in an area that is cold and rainy, an outdoor covered potty area may help convince your Yorkie that stepping outside to do business is not as bad as he thought. Don't forget always to praise lavishly and throw a party every time your Yorkie eliminates outside.

Playful Pooches

When your puppy peeing machine is not actively eliminating on your precious carpet, you may be entertained by this breed's endearing antics. Yorkies love to play and enjoy doing anything that grabs your attention. Because Yorkies were used extensively in textile mills and coal mines for the purpose of hunting vermin, they are drawn naturally to toys that squeak. If you invest in a squeaky toy, make sure you always keep an eye on your Yorkie, as some may chew it open, pull out the squeaker and even decide to swallow it whole.

Petite Puppies

When young, Yorkie puppies are fine-boned, and can be particularly fragile and prone to injury. Because of this, you will need to be extra careful how you handle them. As with other tiny toy breeds, always watch your step when walking and look behind you when you are sitting to avoid accidental squashing and suffocation. Because of this breed's fragility, it does not fare well with young, clumsy children who may injure a vulnerable puppy accidentally.

Party Poopers

Because Yorkies are prone to "Napoleon syndrome" as they grow and become bolder, they may attempt to take on a bigger dog they do not like, but the bigger dog may easily see a yappy Yorkie puppy as an irresistible delicacy. To safeguard your puppy from trouble, he always should be on leash and kept safely away from bigger dogs. Protecting your Yorkie puppy from bigger dogs will need to become second nature if you don't want him to become a tasty dessert.

Productive Yappers

When given the opportunity, the Yorkie breed will feel compelled to sound off the alarm for the slightest noise. If you want a keen watchdog, count your blessings; this yappy breed will make you happy. If you are not a fan of barking, you may be searching desperately for an "off" button. Don't let your Yorkie's sharp tongue get out of hand. The earlier you establish gentle rules and implement consistent training, the better.

Picky Eaters

This breed can be a bit finicky when it comes to eating. Some become this way after being spoiled with table scraps and then start refusing their regular kibble. If your Yorkie puppy is turning his nose to food, make sure you keep an eye on him and take some steps to prevent hypoglycemia, a potentially fatal condition toy and teacup breeds are prone to suffer.

People Pleasers

When socialized well, Yorkies are affectionate towards their people and look forward to getting all the attention they can get. However, fail to socialize this breed well, and you may end up with a yappy Yorkie that is suspicious of everyone and everything. Make sure you dedicate loads of time in socializing your puppy during the critical period for primary socialization. Well socialized Yorkies with sound temperaments thrive on human companionship and love being pampered.

 

About the Author

Adrienne Farricelli has been writing for magazines, books and online publications since 2005. She specializes in canine topics, previously working for the American Animal Hospital Association and receiving certification from the Certification Council for Professional Dog Trainers. Her articles have appeared in "USA Today," "The APDT Chronicle of the Dog" and "Every Dog Magazine." She also contributed a chapter in the book " Puppy Socialization - An Insider's Guide to Dog Behavioral Fitness" by Caryl Wolff.

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