Is There a Way to Recover a Cat's Scratching Post?

by Janine Logue, Demand Media
    Cats keep their claws clean and sharp by scratching.

    Cats keep their claws clean and sharp by scratching.

    A cat scratching post is a must for cats that still have front claws. Scratching is a natural and necessary part of a cat's everyday life. Unfortunately, sometimes scratching posts wear out. Instead of buying a new post, try recovering the old one.

    Items you will need

    • Box cutter
    • Pliers
    • 1/2 inch thick sisal rope or remnant carpet
    • Hot glue
    • Hot glue gun

    Sisal Posts

    Step 1

    Clean off the old sisal rope by cutting it away with a box cutter.

    Step 2

    Open the new rope's packaging so that the sisal will come freely off the spool and heat up the hot glue gun.

    Step 3

    Squeeze a thick line of hot glue across the bottom of the post and press the sisal rope firmly to the glue until it cools.

    Step 4

    Wrap the sisal rope tightly around the post, gluing it in place every third side for a square post or every six inches for a round post.

    Carpet Covered Posts

    Step 1

    Cut away the old carpet with a box cutter. Use pliers to remove any staples left behind.

    Step 2

    Cut the new carpet to the size and shape of the area to be covered. Heat up the glue gun.

    Step 3

    Apply an ample amount of hot glue to the top of the bare post and press the new piece of carpet firmly onto the post until the glue is cool.

    Step 4

    Continue to glue the carpet in small sections until the post is recovered.

    Tip

    • In a pinch, cover a post with thick cardboard.

    Warning

    • Before giving the scratching post back to your cat, test the post for sharp edges or staples by rubbing your hands over it.

    About the Author

    Janine Logue has been a professional writer for daily, weekly and monthly print publications since 2005. She is a contributing writer for several informational websites as well as a freelance SEO writer for various private websites. Logue holds an Associate of Arts in journalism from Bucks County Community College.

    Photo Credits