How to Teach Dogs to Not to Jump on Children

by Kimberly Caines, Demand Media Google
    A well-behaved dog is less scary than one that jumps on you.

    A well-behaved dog is less scary than one that jumps on you.

    When Fido gets exited at the sight of children and jump ups to greet them, he might have the best intentions, but to some the behavior can be scary and potentially cause injuries. To prevent this, be patient and consistent while teaching your pet companion right from wrong.

    Items you will need

    • Child helper
    • Dog treats
    • Leash

    Step 1

    Enlist the help of a brave child, position him outside the door or out of your dog's sight and arm him with dog treats.

    Step 2

    Leash your dog and have him sit at a far enough distance from the door so he can't reach the person entering. Firmly hold the leash so he can't leap forward.

    Step 3

    Instruct the child to walk into the room. When your dog jumps up, firmly say "no, off" and pull his leash down and sideways so he loses his balance. Tell your pet companion to "sit" and give him a treat when he does. The moment your dog's paws come off the floor, the child should ignore him and walk out of the room.

    Step 4

    Repeat this training technique until your dog realizes he doesn't get any attention from the child by jumping. Once your dog stays seated when the child enters, have him praise your pet companion and give him a treat. This teaches your dog that he gets attention when his four paws are on the floor and might motivate him to repeat the behavior.

    Step 5

    Continue enforcing the good behavior every day by having different children approach your dog. Once your dog stops jumping up and sits and waits patiently to be greeted, try the exercise without the leash.

    Tips

    • Inform all family members of the no-jump rule. If one person allows the dog to jump on them, it might ruin the training. The no-jump rule should apply to all people -- not just children.
    • Train your dog from a young age not to jump on people so you don't have to correct his behavior later on.

    About the Author

    Kimberly Caines is a well traveled model, writer and licensed physical fitness trainer who was first published in 1997. Her work has appeared in the Dutch newspaper "De Overschiese Krant" and on various websites. Caines holds a degree in journalism from Mercurius College in Holland and is writing her first novel.

    Photo Credits

    • Liquidlibrary/liquidlibrary/Getty Images