How to Stop Jack Russells From Shedding

by Jen Davis, Demand Media
    For a small dog, your Jack Russell can leave behind a lot of hair.

    For a small dog, your Jack Russell can leave behind a lot of hair.

    Jack Russell terriers are small, highly intelligent and active dogs that tend to be more at home in the fields hunting prey than on your couch watching soap operas with you. As the owner of a Jack Russell you may have noticed that your dog is everywhere, and everywhere he goes he leaves a dusting of fur behind. You will not be able to stop your Jack Russell from shedding. He needs to shed to maintain a healthy coat. You can, however, manage your dog's grooming and control the amount of fur you have to lint roll off your clothing each morning.

    Items you will need

    • Brush
    • Static cloth (optional)

    Step 1

    Take your Jack Russell terrier to the veterinarian for a basic checkup. Poor nutrition and vitamin deficiencies can cause excess shedding so make sure to talk to your veterinarian about the possibility that dietary problems are causing your dog to lose fur. Your veterinarian may notice a skin condition that is responsible for the shedding or suggest you change your dog's diet. Higher quality dog food that contains more protein and carbohydrates than filler is healthier and promotes better coat quality.

    Step 2

    Do not over bathe your dog. Too much bathing will make a Jack Russell shed worse than ever as his skin dries out. Your dog only needs a bath if he is dirty and smells bad. Regular grooming should be able to take care of most of his cleanliness requirements. Try not to bathe your dog more than once every couple of months.

    Step 3

    Brush your Jack Russell regularly using a stiff bristled dog brush to remove loose fur. You also may want to run a static cloth, such as the ones used for floor dusters, across your dog's coat when you are done brushing him to pick up additional loose hairs. A vacuum cleaner attachment that is designed for use grooming pets may be a viable option if your dog is not afraid of the noise the vacuum makes.

    About the Author

    Jen Davis has been writing since 2004. She has served as a newspaper reporter and her freelance articles have appeared in magazines such as "Horses Incorporated," "The Paisley Pony" and "Alabama Living." Davis earned her Bachelor of Arts in communication with a concentration in journalism from Berry College in Rome, Ga.

    Photo Credits

    • Ablestock.com/AbleStock.com/Getty Images