How to Stop Dogs From Urinating on Plants

by Brenna Davis, Demand Media
    Dogs can quickly destroy a beautiful garden.

    Dogs can quickly destroy a beautiful garden.

    House training isn't the only elimination problem pet owners face. A fully house trained dog can still wreak havoc if he's urinating on all of your plants. By taking advantage of your dog's territoriality, you can encourage him to go in a more appropriate location.

    Urination Location Training

    Dogs are territorial creatures of habit, and will frequently urinate in the same location over and over. Take advantage of this fact and teach your dog to urinate in the same place. Take him outside every two to three hours to the chosen spot. When he goes to the bathroom, click a training clicker and give him a treat, along with lots of praise. Repeat this exercise several times each day for two to three weeks.

    Deterrents

    Dogs tend to urinate in places that smell like urine, so removing the urine smell in and around your plants can help solve the problem. Spray your plants with a plant-safe urine odor remover. Many garden stores also sell pet deterrents that you can spray directly onto your plants to discourage urination.

    Giving Alternatives

    Dogs are highly territorial animals, and males are especially likely to mark their territory by urinating on raised objects. Provide your dog with an outlet for this behavior in a more appropriate location and he may stop urinating on plants. Try putting a stake in the ground and reward your dog every time he goes in this location.

    Correcting Mistakes

    If you catch your dog urinating on plants, don't yell or punish him. Instead, encourage him to move to a more appropriate location. If he goes there as well, click the training clicker and give him a treat. Catching your dog in the act is a great opportunity to teach him a more appropriate behavior.

    References

    • The Power of Positive Dog Training; Pat Miller
    • Way to Go!; Karen B. London et al.

    About the Author

    Brenna Davis is a professional writer who covers parenting, pets, health and legal topics. Her articles have appeared in a variety of newspapers and magazines as well as on websites. She is a court-appointed special advocate and is certified in crisis counseling and child and infant nutrition. She holds degrees in developmental psychology and philosophy from Georgia State University.

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