How to Stop Your Doberman From Whining

Whining indicates your Dobe's insecure when he's not getting attention.

Whining indicates your Dobe's insecure when he's not getting attention.

Throughout his lifetime, the Doberman pinscher is a vocal dog -- he uses a variety of sounds, some humorous, to get his desires met. These puppy talks can turn annoying if your Dobe begins throwing tantrums with high-pitched whines and whimpers. Correct whining before it becomes a bad habit.

Ignore the whining. In order to stop a Dobe from whining, you have to ignore the behavior. Once your Doberman is quiet, enthusiastically praise him for being quiet. If he starts whining, turn your back to him and ignore him until he stops. This quickly teaches him that whining does not get attention. Do not talk to your dog while he's whining. Even saying “be quiet” is giving your dog attention and keeping the whining from stopping, the Dog Obedience Advice website suggests.

Crate-train your Doberman to provide a denlike atmosphere of safety and security. Incorrect crate-training leads to separation anxiety and fear of the crate, which in return can cause excessive whining. Use your happy voice to say “Crate time!” and place your Dobie inside the crate with a small treat. Stay in the room and let him out after five minutes, if he has stopped whining. Do not let him out until he stops whining and, again, don't tell the Doberman to be quiet. Perform these steps several times each day, building in five minute increments until your Dobe quietly stays crated 30 minutes with you in the room. Shortly your Dobe will recognize the phrase "Crate time!" and go to the crate for a treat. Working again in five-minute increments, this time leave the room. Continue to increase the length of time you're outside the room . Once your Dobe stays quietly in the crate alone for 30 minutes, he can stay in the crate one hour for each month of his age, but this should never exceed six hours without a potty break or exercise.

Provide your Doberman sufficient exercise. Whining is annoying, but it's also a form of communication. A Dobe is likely to whine if he has pent-up energy or is bored. Sufficient exercise can prevent whining from occurring. Dobermans are extremely active dogs; they require mental stimulation. Provide at least 30 to 60 minutes of daily run time for your Dobie to burn energy -- not necessarily all at once.

Give a series of basic commands so your Dobe is performing productive behaviors instead of whining. As long as your dog knows basic obedience commands, this technique shifts your Doberman pinscher's attention from the source of his whining to the task you've commanded. Once your Dobe begins whining, say "sit" and "down." If he follows the commands, say "good dog" and give him a treat. Next time, have your dog sit; then say "stay" and walk away for 20 to 30 seconds. If your Dobe is quiet, say "come." Once your Dobe reaches you, say "sit" and reward him with a treat. The Doberman pinscher loves mental challenges; a training session using a series of commands distracts him and rewards obedient behaviors.

Items you will need

  • Treats
  • Crate
  • Leash
  • Chew toys
  • Water
  • Food
  • Bedding

Tips

  • Make the crate a positive place by incorporating soft bedding, inedible chew toys, fresh water and food.
  • Avoid conflict with family members if your Doberman is present. Dobes are extremely sensitive to their surroundings. Whining and even vomiting can result if the Dobe senses tension in the home.
  • Never give table scraps to shut up a whiny Doberman. This reinforces the whining behavior for years to come.

Warnings

  • If your Doberman pinscher whines when eating, moving or going to the bathroom, seek medical attention from your dog's veterinarian. Whining can be a sign of pain, according to Dog Obedience Advisor.
  • Never physically punish a Doberman for whining since punishment can cause aggression and other behavioral problems.
 

References

About the Author

Melissa McNamara is a certified personal trainer who holds a Bachelor of Arts in journalism and communication studies from the University of Iowa. She writes for various health and fitness publications while working toward a Bachelor of Science in nursing.

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