How to Stop Beagles From Fighting With Each Other

Beagles are generally not aggressive dogs so you may have a problem if yours are fighting regularly.

Beagles are generally not aggressive dogs so you may have a problem if yours are fighting regularly.

Beagles that want to fight with one another, either due to a dominance struggle or aggressive personalities, can take the joy out of pet ownership. Worrying about your dogs attacking one another or harming one another during a fight is enough to make any pet owner desperate for a solution. While you may never succeed at making your dogs best friends, you can manage their behavior.

Separate your dogs before they harm one another. Purchasing a pair of kennels may be the best way to keep aggressive dogs apart until you can get to the root of the behavioral problems. Place each dog in its individual kennel and only allow one dog out at a time. Keep each away from the other kennel to avoid aggressive behavior.

Feed and give water to your dogs separately to avoid food aggression or aggressive behavior that may occur when one of your beagle's views the other as competition for his food, toys or treats.

Place your dogs in separate carriers or muzzle and leash them when you have to put both dogs in the same general area, such as on a trip to the veterinarian. Separate carriers are ideal because leashed dogs may try to fight with one another.

Hire a professional dog trainer to help figure out why your dogs are fighting. Beagles are not typically an aggressive breed but you may be fostering a situation that is causing the aggression; a dog trainer may be able to uncover the issue. Your dog trainer also needs to identify the aggressor between the two dogs and work with that animal one-on-one to overcome his behavioral issues.

Items you will need

  • Leash
  • Collar
  • Muzzle
  • Carriers
  • Kennels

Tip

  • Some dog owners can break up fights using loud noises or squirt guns.

Warning

  • Do not attempt to get in between your beagles when they are fighting because you could be injured.
 

About the Author

Jen Davis has been writing since 2004. She has served as a newspaper reporter and her freelance articles have appeared in magazines such as "Horses Incorporated," "The Paisley Pony" and "Alabama Living." Davis earned her Bachelor of Arts in communication with a concentration in journalism from Berry College in Rome, Ga.

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