Self-Grooming Brush for Cats

by Mary Lougee, Demand Media
    Good nail care for cats includes cleaning her claws.

    Good nail care for cats includes cleaning her claws.

    A cat gets many benefits from routine grooming and brushing. Your kitty can brush herself with a self-grooming brush, even if you work long hours and are away from home. This product can save you time and money in several areas.

    Hair Removal

    Cats are generally very clean pets who love to be brushed. When you brush your cat, especially starting from a young age, she forms a bond with you. Cats may rub against furniture or a person’s legs to show love for them. A self-grooming brush allows your cat to groom herself even when you are not home. It removes loose hair so there is less pet hair on your clothes and furniture, which leads to less cleaning time.

    Skin Stimulation

    Brushing a cat not only removes dying hair and dirt from her fur, but removes skin flakes also. Flaky skin can make your pet itch and scratch a lot and lead to skin disorders. Brushing cats also stimulates the blood circulation to increase the production of natural oils and keep her coat shiny and soft.

    Scratch Pad

    Self-grooming brushes have a large pad at the bottom covered with carpeting. This portion of the brush serves as a place for your cat to sharpen her claws, much like a scratching post. It will also clean dirt off her claws and she extends and retracts them to keep nails healthy. Alternate scratching areas just for cats tend to keep them from sharpening claws on your furniture, which can become a very expensive habit.

    Fewer Hairballs

    Grooming a cat often will remove excess hair your cat would otherwise swallow in grooming herself. Excess hair in the digestive system leads to hairballs and a persistent cough. Hairballs can lead to severe constipation and pain for your kitty. Grooming will save on the cost of hairball remedies for your feline friend.

    Considerations

    You will need to clean the hair off a self-grooming brush for your cat when it is partially full, but it saves you the time of brushing her after a long day at work when she can perform the duty herself.

    About the Author

    Mary Lougee is a writer in Texas who writes on a wide variety of subjects from home improvement to pet care. Her love of animals led to building a farm and caring for rescue animals from equine and swine to dogs and cats. She holds a bachelor's degree in management.

    Photo Credits

    • cat paw closeup image by Ricardo Verde Costa from Fotolia.com