What Does a Seal Mitted Ragdoll Kitten Look Like?

Ragdoll is a breed of cat, seal is a color and mitted is a pattern.

Ragdoll is a breed of cat, seal is a color and mitted is a pattern.

It seems like breeders and cat fanciers speak a language of their own. With the enormous constellation of breeds, tones and patterns, you can easily get confused listening to a description of a kitten you've never seen. Don't be alarmed. Deciphering coloration is easy when you understand the terms.

Ragdoll

The ragdoll is a fairly new breed of cat, originating from a colorful lady from Riverside, California, in the 1960s. They're named after their tendency to flop limply while being carted around in their favorite humans' arms. These guys are large (up to 20 pounds as adults), stocky and big-boned. Typical ragdolls are long-haired, though there's a short-haired type. Their hair is very soft, like a rabbit's, and is kind of "sticky" when it sheds (which is supposed to be easier to clean off your stuff). Blue eyes are a breed characteristic.

Seal

Seal is one of the official breed colors recognized by both main cat showing organizations, the Cat Fanciers' Association and the International Cat Association. It just means dark brown (presumably like many of the aquatic animals known as seals). Seal-colored ragdolls usually have some dark-chocolate brown with some lighter tan brown. The darkest color is usually on their faces, legs above the ankles, back and tail, but the exact pattern can vary.

Mitted

Mitted means a cat has fur baby has white paws. On the front, the white often only goes up to the ankles, so it looks like she's wearing mittens; on the back, it can go all the way up to the hips (more like she's wearing thigh-highs). A seal mitted ragdoll may have some white on the chest, tummy and face as well.

Kitten Concerns

One thing to keep in mind, if you're in love with a particular color or pattern, is that ragdolls are a slow-growing breed. as far as cats go. These kitties don't develop their final adult coat colors until age 2, and it can take them as long as age 4 to reach their full adult size. So take any guarantees about what a kitten will eventually look like with a grain of salt, and love your fuzzy baby for her individuality, not her color and coat pattern.

 

About the Author

Angela Libal began writing professionally in 2005. She has published several books, specializing in zoology and animal husbandry. Libal holds a degree in behavioral science: animal science from Moorpark College, a Bachelor of Arts from Sarah Lawrence College and is a graduate student in cryptozoology.

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