How to Get Rid of Roundworms in Kittens

Roundworms grow in your kitten's intestines.

Roundworms grow in your kitten's intestines.

Toxicara cati or Toxascaris leonina, commonly called roundworms, are picked up by kittens and adult cats during everyday play. Signs your kitten is infected include symptoms of a belly ache, like vomiting worms, diarrhea and ascites, or swelling of the abdomen. Although death is not common with roundworms, getting rid of them helps ensure your baby stays healthy and grows properly.

Weigh your kitten. Kitchen scales are an easy way to get an accurate weight. Remember, this is important because the treatment is based on weight. This helps you give him enough medication to be effective and not too much to make him sicker.

Buy an oral over-the-counter roundworm medication containing an approved treatment formula for kittens, such as Pyrantel paomate, Albendazole or Mebendazole. These formulas kill roundworms but don't harm the baby's sensitive digestive system.

Put the medication on your kitten's food by following the instructions on the label. Use the measuring cup included with the medicine. A soft, canned food helps you trick him into taking the medicine.

Finish the recommended dosage. Don't stop giving the medicine too early or give it longer than directed. This helps clear up the roundworms. Remember though, it doesn't prevent her from getting them again.

Repeat the process two or three weeks after the initial treatment to ensure no remaining larva mature. After all, it helps your little kitty mature into a healthy cat.

Items you will need

  • Scale
  • Roundworm medication

Tip

  • Have your kitten tested by a veterinarian after the final treatment to ensure no larva remains. Work with your veterinarian and determine a worming schedule to prevent future infestation. If your kitten does not eat the food with the medication on it, squirt it directly in his mouth using a small syringe.

Warning

  • Always remove feces from your kitten’s litter box immediately, since this is how the eggs are spread.
 

About the Author

Amanda Maddox began writing professionally in 2007. Her work appears on various websites focusing on topics about medical billing, coding, real estate, insurance, accounting and business. Maddox has her insurance and real estate licenses and holds an Associate of Applied Science in accounting and business administration from Wallace State Community College.

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