How to Get Rid of a Pet Smell in a Leather Chair

Your leather chair is less likely to smell like your animals if you train your pets to stay off it.

Your leather chair is less likely to smell like your animals if you train your pets to stay off it.

Leather furniture coverings are durable and easy to clean, suitable for homes with pets. But since it is a porous material, leather can absorb moisture and odors. The longer your chair is exposed to your pets, the worse it will smell.

Clean Your Chair

Regular upkeep is key to keeping leather furniture in good condition. Cleaning your chair several times a week or even daily will greatly reduce hair, debris and microscopic matter smell, helping prevent a significant pet smell from developing. Clean your chair daily, removing pet hair and dander with a vaccuum cleaner, then wiping it down with leather cleaner and/or conditioner.

Air It Out

If your chair sits in a pet-filled home, it may need airing out to help eliminate the odor. Place your chair in a well-ventilated outdoor area. Make sure the chair gets plenty of airflow without being exposed to direct sunlight or rain. A covered porch may be a good place to air out your chair. Expect it to take several days before the smell really starts to fade.

Air Fresheners

Place activated charcoal or baking soda underneath or behind the chair to help absorb the odors in the chair and room. You can also discretely hide an air freshener underneath the chair to help cover the smell.

Maintain Your Pets

Its a lot easier to keep your chair and other furniture from smelling like animals if you keep your animals clean. Brush your pets regularly to keep loose hair and dead cells to a minimum. Bathe your pets at regular intervals. If possible, train your pets to stay off the furniture. If your animals are going to be on the chair, consider using a washable slipcover to keep pet dirt and mess off the leather surface.

 

About the Author

Jen Davis has been writing since 2004. She has served as a newspaper reporter and her freelance articles have appeared in magazines such as "Horses Incorporated," "The Paisley Pony" and "Alabama Living." Davis earned her Bachelor of Arts in communication with a concentration in journalism from Berry College in Rome, Ga.

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