How to Reduce Shedding in a Yellow Lab Dog

by Christina Schnell, Demand Media
    Protective furniture covers, along with reduced shedding techniques, can save your sanity.

    Protective furniture covers, along with reduced shedding techniques, can save your sanity.

    Your yellow lab brings you joy, but she also leaves a lot of yellow hair. Yellow labs don't necessarily shed more than black labs, but light-colored fur contrasts more than black hair on non-white surfaces. Removing her dead fur before it sheds is just the start of in-home hair-cloud reduction.

    Brush Off the Top

    Brush your yellow lab at least three times a week with a slicker brush, a pin brush or a rubber-backed curry brush to remove loose hair from her coarse outer coat. Start at her back or neck and move in the direction of hair growth. These small, straight hairs are the ones that stick to your black pants when she lovingly rubs up against you, and unlike her undercoat, they shed constantly throughout the year.

    Comb Out the Undercoat

    Your yellow lab is most likely to shed her undercoat during the fall and spring. To reduce the balls of soft undercoat fur around your house, you should comb her daily with a shed blade after first brushing her with a slicker or curry brush. Comb her entire coat firmly enough to reach the undercoat, but don't bear down too hard and always go in the direction of hair growth. Start at her neck and chest and work your way back toward her rear and tail. To avoid discomfort, don't use the shed blade on your lab's lower legs or belly, which aren't as densely coated.

    Massage While Bathing

    Use bath time as another opportunity to remove stray hairs. After completing the brushing procedure, bathing your lab once a week during shedding season can further reduce the amount of hair shed -- provided you do it correctly. After applying dog-friendly shampoo, massage your pooch all over with a rubber brush or coarse bath mitt to further loosen those stubborn yellow hairs. Since lab coats don't tangle like many breeds, you can massage vigorously without causing painful snarls. Soap residue can irritate your lab's skin, so make sure to rinse her coat twice after applying dog-friendly conditioner.

    Health Factors

    While yellow labs are notorious shedders by nature, certain health conditions can increase the rate of shedding even more than usual. Hormonal imbalances, thyroid conditions, allergies, low-quality dog food and stress can cause excessive shedding. Speak with your veterinarian if you suspect your yellow lab is shedding too much or if she appears uncomfortable and is constantly scratching or itching. Addressing these health issues with your veterinarian won't end all shedding, but it can considerably reduce the size of hair tumbleweeds in your home.

    About the Author

    Christina Bednarz Schnell began writing full-time in 2010. Her areas of expertise include child development and behavior, medical conditions and pet health. She holds a Bachelor of Arts in international relations.

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