Red and Swollen Eyes in Parakeets

Eye problems in parakeets require immediate vet attention.

Eye problems in parakeets require immediate vet attention.

Birds can see with amazing accuracy, making their eyes among their most valuable attributes. Occasionally, one or both eyes can become red and swollen due to injury, infection or disease. If your parakeet has an eye problem, a vet trip is essential to restore your feathered friend’s healthy peepers.

Conjunctivitis

Birds with conjunctivitis present swelling and inflammation of the conjunctiva, the mucous membrane that covers the eyeballs and lines the eyelids. This common eye disorder causes parakeets' eyes to become red, swollen and sensitive to light. A bacterial infection, conjunctivitis is generally treated with antibiotic eye drops. Conjunctivitis, also referred to as pinkeye, can be a condition in itself or a symptom of another medical condition, such as a respiratory infection.

Uveitis

When the internal structures of the eye become inflamed, uveitis may be the cause. This inflammation requires immediate vet attention to prevent the formation of cataracts. Your parakeet’s red and swollen eyes may be accompanied by discharge, constant blinking or a shut eyelid. If you suspect your bird has uveitis or another eye problem, consult your vet.

Blepharitis

Blepharitis is often confused with conjunctivitis due to their similar symptoms. While blepharitis can cause redness and irritation, the inflammation occurs in the bird’s eyelids. This condition affects both eyes, often causing intense itching. To treat blepharitis, your vet may prescribe an anti-inflammatory or antifungal medication as well as ophthalmic ointment to clear up your winged buddy’s vision.

Eye Injury

Birds are susceptible to various eye injuries, often caused from falling or flying into objects. Eye injuries can cause the affected eye to become red, sore and swollen. You may notice your parakeet squinting or rubbing the side of his face against his wing. As the eye becomes inflamed, it may appear discolored and the third eyelid may protrude. If any substance has entered the eye, such as dust, the eye requires flushing immediately with water or a sterile saline solution. Always pay a visit to your vet to ensure your parakeet’s eye injury is properly diagnosed and treated.

 

About the Author

Based in northern New York, Brandy Burgess has been writing on pets, technical documentation and health resources since 2007. She also writes on personal development for YourFreelanceWritingCareer.com. Burgess' work also has appeared on various online publications, including eHow.com. Burgess holds a Bachelor of Arts in computer information systems from DeVry University and her certified nurses aid certification.

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