How to Prevent a Dog From Chewing on Baseboard Trim

by Sarah Dray, Demand Media
    Don't trust that innocent face.

    Don't trust that innocent face.

    You just finished installing a nice baseboard trim -- only to have Rover decide it makes for a great chewing toy. Take a deep breath. You can convince Puppy that there are better chewing options out there.

    Give Him Chewing Options

    To start, buy Rover a mix of soft and hard chewing sticks and bones. Pet stores even sell flavored rubber bones that are gentle on the gums. These are ideal for puppies who are teething and can't handle hard bones. Get an assortment of toys as well. A few squeaky ones to attract attention plus a few hard ones -- as hard as baseboard, if possible -- for times when only intense chewing will do. Make sure every room that has baseboard trim also has a few chew toy options.

    Get Moving on the Training

    While it might be obvious to you, Puppy probably doesn't know that chewing the baseboard trim is not acceptable -- so you need to let him know about it. A firm "no" might be all it takes, even if you have to say it 20 or 50 times before it sinks in. If that alone doesn't work, say "no" and then move Puppy somewhere else. Give him a toy or a bone to chew on so he knows there are better options than chewing your house off.

    Make the Trim Unattractive

    Another option is to spray the baseboard trim with something disgusting that will send your dog running the other way. This only works if he's chewing on a particular section of the trim -- otherwise, you'll have to spray your whole house. Vinegar, ammonia, hot pepper mixed with water and even alcohol all work. Or you can get a commercial pet deterrent spray from your local pet store.

    Make the Trim Unreachable

    Rover is not going to chew the baseboard trim if he can't get to it. If the problem is only in one room, you can simply close the door or block the entrance with a baby gate. Or place a piece of furniture right in front of the chewed-up area so he can't get to it. After a while, he might simply forget about it and focus his attention somewhere else.

    About the Author

    Sarah Dray has been writing since 1996. She specializes in health, wellness and travel topics and has credits in various publications including "Woman's Day," "Marie Claire," "Adirondack Life" and "Self." She is also a seasoned independent traveler and a certified personal trainer and nutrition consultant. Dray is pursuing a criminal justice degree at Penn Foster College.

    Photo Credits

    • Jupiterimages/Photos.com/Getty Images