Prescription Diet for Cat Tartar

Jaw structure can cause dental problems that can not be fixed with diet food.

Jaw structure can cause dental problems that can not be fixed with diet food.

Without proper dental hygiene, tartar build up in the mouth of a cat causes serious health issues and pain. Brushing is best to keep this build-up at a minimum, but cat prescription diet food for tartar control is another tool veterinarians use to help keep dental disease from becoming a problem.

Prescription Brands

The most recent prescription dental cat food to receive the Veterinary Oral Health Council's Seal of Acceptance is Royal Canin's Feline Dental Diet in 2012. Purina Veterinary Diets DH Dental Health brand Feline Formula received its seal in 2006 and Hill's Science Diet's dental cat food t/d had a new and improved formula get the seal in 2001. This signifies that theses products are "intended to help retard plaque and tartar on the teeth of animals." All these brands are meant to be sold only through a prescribing veterinarian, with the exception of the Royal Canin brand, which can also be sold over the counter.

Their Claim

Royal Canin also has an "Oral Sensitive" food that claims the unique kibble shape causes a brushing effect on the teeth and that agents in the food bind and remove salivary calcium before it becomes tartar. Purina's Dental Health food formula uses textured kibble as its means to control tartar.

Other Methods

Rinses, sprays, gels and chews are also available to assist in good dental hygiene, and like the food, should be used only at the advice of a vet. Cat Essential Healthy Mouth makes a spray, a gel, and even a water additive, but they mention in their trial reports that brushing is still the best form of dental hygiene for cats.

Brushing

Nothing can replace daily brushing for effectiveness in keeping a cat's mouth healthy. Brushing removes the deposits of plaque that cannot be removed by the special kibble. Human toothpaste should never be used. Special toothpaste made for pets and sold by a veterinarian is best.

 

About the Author

Cait Smith has been writing professionally since 2003 when she wrote and edited for her college paper, "The Cherokee Signal" for three years. She then wrote for two years at her university paper "The Echo," while she studied journalism. She holds a Bachelor of Arts in communications from the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga.

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