Porkie Puppy Information

by Jane Meggitt, Demand Media Google
    Porkies are half one of these, a Yorkshire terrier.

    Porkies are half one of these, a Yorkshire terrier.

    While the name porkie conjures up images of a fat little dog resembling a piglet, a porkie puppy is actually a cross between the Yorkshire terrier and the Pomeranian. This mixed-breed "designer dog" also goes by the name Yoranian. No matter what their name, porkie puppies are cute.

    Size

    Porkie puppies are tiny. Even when full-grown they weigh only between 3 and 7 pounds. At maturity, Porkies are between 6 inches and 1 foot tall at the shoulder. Males are somewhat larger than females. The American Kennel Club, the governing body of purebred dog registration in the United States, does not recognize the porkie as a breed but does have size and weight standards for the parents if both are purebreds. Some porkie puppies result from porkie-to-porkie breeding.

    Appearance

    The porkie, also known as a Yorkie Pom, resembles either parent. Many look like terriers with Pomeranian coloring. Porkie breeders tend to mate a Pomeranian female with a Yorkshire terrier male to produce the mix. While Yorkies generally have black and tan coats, the porkie often has the long hair of the Yorkie with the tan, white or other solid colors of the Pomeranian. Of course, some puppies look more like Yorkies and vice-versa. The porkie requires regular brushing, with trips to the groomer to keep him clipped and dapper.

    Temperament

    Bred for companionship, a porkie loves his person. He wants to sit on your lap or accompany you on your outings. Both breeds tend to be energetic, outgoing and spirited. With all that going for them, neither breed requires a great deal of exercise. For that reason, porkies make good dogs for city dwellers. Your porkie puppy is likely to be an alert, intelligent little guy.

    Training

    Because your little guy is bright and sensitive, he'll probably respond well to training. Good training not only makes a better pet but helps you bond with your dog. Like many small dogs, housebreaking might be initially problematic. Be patient and consistent, and he'll get the idea eventually.

    About the Author

    Jane Meggitt has been a writer for more than 20 years. In addition to reporting for a major newspaper chain, she has been published in "Horse News," "Suburban Classic," "Hoof Beats," "Equine Journal" and other publications. She has a Bachelor of Arts in English from New York University and an Associate of Arts from the American Academy of Dramatics Arts, New York City.

    Photo Credits

    • yorkie or yorkshire terrier image by Trina Mole from Fotolia.com