Pomeranian Behavior

I have you twisted around my little paw.

I have you twisted around my little paw.

It's no coincidence that your Pomeranian resembles a fox. Just like Reynard, he's smart, alert and brave. Unlike a fox, he probably won't kill chickens or other poultry. He doesn't need to -- he has you to cater to his every desire. He's absolutely right, isn't he?

Personality

With a pom, you have an active, bold, bouncy, fun little companion dog. He likes to play and be the center of attention. This tiny and happy guy doesn't think of himself as a small dog. In his mind, he's the size of his cousins, all the various Spitz sledding and herding types. He's outgoing and can be demanding. He also yaps -- that is, barks -- a lot if not trained otherwise. The plus side is he makes a good little watchdog. The downside is -- he barks a lot.

Compatibility

Poms generally get along well with felines, so if you have a cat or intend to get one, it shouldn't be a problem. He also gets along with other dogs, but because the average pom weighs 7 pounds, he can get hurt easily by a larger dog even in a play situation. If he thinks another dog is threatening you, watch out. A pom might take it on, usually to his detriment. He's good with kids, but small dogs and small children generally aren't a good mix; little kids can unintentionally harm a tiny pom.

Training

Despite his size, or lack of it, the pom is an athletic dog who can hold his own in agility, obedience, rally and other canine sports. He's small enough to live comfortably in an apartment, but he does require daily walks and sufficient exercise. He loves to play games, so find some favorites such as fetch that engage the two of you. One caveat: He can be hard to housetrain. Have patience -- he'll get there, eventually.

Grooming

The pom's luxurious double coat is his crowning glory. It also takes a fair amount of grooming to keep him looking good. Brush him several times a week, taking him to the groomer as needed. Because of his coat, he doesn't do well in hot weather. He's not an outdoor dog to begin with, but in warm weather just let him out to do his business or take him for shorter walks. He prefers the air-conditioned house, thank you very much.

 

About the Author

Jane Meggitt has been a writer for more than 20 years. In addition to reporting for a major newspaper chain, she has been published in "Horse News," "Suburban Classic," "Hoof Beats," "Equine Journal" and other publications. She has a Bachelor of Arts in English from New York University and an Associate of Arts from the American Academy of Dramatics Arts, New York City.

Photo Credits

  • cautious pomeranian image by John Sfondilias from Fotolia.com