How to Get Your Pit Bull's Coat Shiny

by Brenna Davis, Demand Media
    A pit bull's coat is one measure of overall health.

    A pit bull's coat is one measure of overall health.

    Pit bulls' coats require relatively little maintenance, but achieving a shiny, glistening coat can be challenging, particularly with active dogs who are always getting dirty. By bathing your dog regularly and making a few simple dietary changes, you can help your dog get a stunning coat.

    Items you will need

    • Fish oil capsules
    • Boar-bristle brush
    • Oatmeal shampoo
    • Dog fur conditioner

    Step 1

    Incorporate fish oil into your dog's diet. Fish oil is rich in fatty acids that can improve the state of your dog's coat and improve dry skin. Give your dog one fish oil capsule each day. You can incorporate it into his regular meal or wrap it in peanut butter or another treat.

    Step 2

    Choose dog food wisely. Healthy foods increase the shine of your dog's coat, while cheap foods can cause allergies as well as skin and coat problems. Meat should be the first ingredient listed in your dog's food. Fillers such as corn and grains can reduce the shine of your dog's coat and may cause allergies in some dogs.

    Step 3

    Brush your dog two to three times a week with a boar-bristle brush. Natural boar bristles distribute the oil on your dog's skin to his coat and will help to give the coat a natural shine.

    Step 4

    Bathe your dog only when his fur feels greasy or he is visibly dirty. Excessive bathing can strip the natural oils from your dog's fur and result in a dull, lifeless coat. Use an oatmeal shampoo, which is gentle on the skin and coat and can reduce dryness and itching. For added shine, use a dog fur conditioner after shampooing. Brush your dog's fur with a boar-bristle brush while he is damp.

    References

    About the Author

    Brenna Davis is a professional writer who covers parenting, pets, health and legal topics. Her articles have appeared in a variety of newspapers and magazines as well as on websites. She is a court-appointed special advocate and is certified in crisis counseling and child and infant nutrition. She holds degrees in developmental psychology and philosophy from Georgia State University.

    Photo Credits

    • Portrait of the american staffordshire terrier. isolated image by Sergey Sukhorukov from Fotolia.com