Multi-Cat Litter vs. Single-Cat Litter

They might not like sharing when they grow up.

They might not like sharing when they grow up.

When you have more than one cat in the house, maintaining a few clean litter boxes is more important than ever. Cats are territorial and choosy about where they do their business, so choosing a multi-cat litter can make things better -- or make them worse.

Set up several litter boxes throughout the house. You need at least one box per cat, so if you have two cats, you need two boxes. Three cats, three boxes. Place them in different rooms, because cats can be territorial, and may try to keep other kitties away from areas they consider to be theirs. If you have the option to keep them on separate floors, go for it.

Fill each box with 2 inches of litter. This is when you have to start experimenting with multi-cat and single-cat litters. Multi-cat litters are generally stronger, providing better clumping and odor control. However, increased odor control may be off-putting to your cats, as it may be the result of artificial fragrances. See if your cats are receptive to the litter. If they aren't, the signs will be obvious -- they'll go to the bathroom everywhere except the box. And don't let that multi-cat strength lull you into complacency. No matter how strong the litter is, you should be scooping daily.

Scoop out the litter and dispose of clumps every day. If your single-cat litter isn't sufficiently clumping or the odor is just too much, consider switching over to a multi-cat formula. Spreading a thin coating of baking soda across the bottom of the box also helps control the smell, and it doesn't typically deter cats the way that fragrant litters can.

Switch litters gradually. If you're going to experiment with switching between multi-cat and single-cat litters, don't just dump the box and start from scratch -- the sudden change can freak out your kitty. Instead, gradually introduce more and more of the new litter while phasing out the old. The slow change is less dramatic and makes your animals feel more at ease with the adjustment.

Items you will need

  • At least one litter box per cat
  • Cat litter
  • Litter scoop
  • Baking soda
 

About the Author

Tom Ryan is a freelance writer, editor and English tutor. He graduated from the University of Pittsburgh with a degree in English writing, and has also worked as an arts and entertainment reporter with "The Pitt News" and a public relations and advertising copywriter with the Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh.

Photo Credits

  • Jupiterimages/Photos.com/Getty Images