What Do Mountain Cur Dogs Look Like?

by Jane Meggitt, Demand Media Google
    Besides hunting, mountain cur dogs also like hugging.

    Besides hunting, mountain cur dogs also like hugging.

    According to the dictionary, a cur is "a mongrel or inferior dog." Don't tell fans of the mountain cur dog that their canines are inferior. Bred to hunt small game such as squirrels and rabbits, the mountain cur's strengths lie in his working ability, not his good looks.

    Size

    Mountain curs are medium sized dogs, but there are no minimum or maximum weight and height requirements. Generally, mountain curs weigh between 30 and 60 pounds and stand between 18 and 26 inches high at the shoulder. Females are smaller than males.No matter what a mountain cur looks like, his ability to work is always paramount.

    Colors and Coat

    Most colors are permitted in the United Kennel Club breed standard. These include black, black with brindle or tan points, blue, blond, brown, red, brindle, yellow or buckskin. Mountain curs can have white markings, but can't be more than one-third white. Albino curs aren't permitted. His short-haired coat, either smooth or rough quality, requires little grooming, although he should receive a good brushing after a day's hunting. Check for any cuts or scrapes and remove any vegetation he's acquired.

    Head

    The mountain cur's short to medium length ears drop down -- erect or semi-erect ears are considered a fault. He has a broad, flat skull. His muzzle is a little shorter than the skull, with a strong underjaw. His lips and nose should share the same shade. The jowls and cheeks shouldn't display excess flesh, but the dog's face should have clean lines. The nose is square rather than round, with large, open nostrils. The eyes should always be level, not slanted.

    Body

    The mountain cur has a muscular and well-conditioned body. He should be a little longer than he is tall. Mountain curs' possess broad, strong backs. His strong hindquarters should balance his front end. The tail is low-set, with hunters preferring it bobbed. If it's not bobbed, the tail is medium length and the mountain cur carries it high.

    About the Author

    Jane Meggitt has been a writer for more than 20 years. In addition to reporting for a major newspaper chain, she has been published in "Horse News," "Suburban Classic," "Hoof Beats," "Equine Journal" and other publications. She has a Bachelor of Arts in English from New York University and an Associate of Arts from the American Academy of Dramatics Arts, New York City.

    Photo Credits

    • Ryan McVay/Stockbyte/Getty Images