Making Bungee Cord Toys for Dogs

"I'm so bored! Where's my bungee cord toy?"

"I'm so bored! Where's my bungee cord toy?"

Lexi is tug-of-war champ, always trying to best you or anyone else at the other end of her rope. Make your dog a tug toy with bungee cord. Unlike rope, it stretches, so there's less risk of injury if one or the other of you tugs too hard.

Encase It

Stitch a length of bungee cord inside some nylon canvas toy to create a durable dog toy with a stretchy quality. You can shape the toy like anything from a bone to another animal, such as a squirrel or a chicken. Cut the bungee cord shorter than the longest part of the toy and secure it inside by stitching it to opposite edges of the canvas piece. When the toy is finished, the bungee cord will cause the canvas to bunch up but, because there's more canvas than bungee, your dog will be able to stretch the toy past "normal" limits.

Attach a Toy

Poke or drill a hole in a ball or stuffed squeak toy and run the end of a bungee cord through the hole. Tie a knot in the end of the cord to keep the toy from slipping off the cord when Lexi tugs on it. You can attach the other end of the bungee cord to a dowel to create a toy that you can play with together, or tie a slipknot in it. That will allow you to attach Lexi's bungee toy to a doorknob or other fixed object, so she can play when you're too busy to tug.

Keeping Boredom at Bay

Lexi is a smart, active doggy who likes puzzles as much as she likes to play. Use a bungee cord to create an interactive toy that makes her work for her snacks. Poke some holes in the bottom of a plastic gallon milk jug, making them just a little bigger than her kibble so that the pieces can fall through. Fill the jug with kibble and then loop a length of bungee through the handle of the jug and use the cord to hang it overhead. Make sure that Lexi can reach the jug to knock it around and work the kibble out of the bottom.

Keep it Safe

You shouldn't attach anything too fragile or brittle to the end of a bungee cord for Lexi to play with. She'll make short work of anything that can break too easily, and there's always the chance that she'll swallow some of the broken pieces. The same goes for attaching anything with smaller pieces that can be chewed or pulled free, because your dog could swallow them, too. If Lexi is a chewer, you'll want to put her bungee toys away unless you're nearby to supervise. If you don't keep her from gnawing on the bungee, she could swallow bits of the cord itself, which can cause blockage in her intestines.

 

About the Author

Elle Di Jensen has been a writer and editor since 1990. She began working in the fitness industry in 1987, and her experience includes editing and publishing a workout manual. She has an extended family of pets, including special needs animals. Jensen attended Idaho and Boise State Universities. Her work has appeared in various print and online publications.

Photo Credits

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