How to Make Your Puppy Pee Outside When It Is Raining

Walks in the rain don't have to feel like torture.

Walks in the rain don't have to feel like torture.

Is going for a bathroom break in the rain a headache? You're not alone. Many dogs hate the idea of getting wet on the way to a pee break. If yours is one of them, you might need a bit of tricking and training to fix the problem.

Fun in the Rain

Teaching your puppy to love water could make a world of difference when the rain comes. If he learns early on that rain means fun, he should have no problem stepping outside when it's time to pee. Some breeds—such as spaniels and Labradors—are natural water lovers. Other doggies might need to be convinced that getting wet could be fun. Try playing with water in your yard, turning on the sprinklers or putting out a small inflatable child pool for your puppy to play in. If you want your puppy to love water, don't use it as a training method—squirting him with water when he does something wrong will teach him to associate water with bad things.

A Bit of Protection

If your dog just hates the feeling of being wet, buy him a raincoat. Doggy raincoats come in all sizes and types, so you should be able to find one that fits your pal. Some come with hoods. If you don't have one yet, buy yourself an extra-large umbrella—if your pooch is used to walking right next to you, you can use the umbrella to offer extra protection.

Join in the Misery

If your doggy hates the rain, put on your own raincoat or grab an umbrella and take him for a walk. If he's on a leash, he'll have no choice but to go with you. If you usually just let him out into the yard, go with him—even if it means putting a leash on him. He might not be happy that he has to step into the rain but he's more likely to follow if you're "suffering along" with him.

On-Command Peeing

You can train your pooch to pee on command—especially if reward treats are involved. Simply pick a phrase to mean it's time for a bathroom break—something like "Go now" or "Go pee" should work. Then start training on sunny days by saying the words when you see he's ready to go—you'll need to figure out the cues that he's ready to pee, such as sniffing the ground or circling a tree or wall. When he's done, offer him a reward. Once he's mastered the on-command peeing on good days, try it out in the rain. It might take some time for him to get used to it, but if there's a reward involved, he'll be more willing to follow through.

 

About the Author

Tammy Dray has been writing since 1996. She specializes in health, wellness and travel topics and has credits in various publications including Woman's Day, Marie Claire, Adirondack Life and Self. She is also a seasoned independent traveler and a certified personal trainer and nutrition consultant. Dray is pursuing a criminal justice degree at Penn Foster College.

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