How to Make a Litter Box for a Large Dog

by Jane Williams, Demand Media
    When you gotta go, you gotta go.

    When you gotta go, you gotta go.

    Dogs usually take to the great outdoors to relieve themselves. But age, medical issues and your work schedule can necessitate teaching Thor to do his duty inside, using a litter box. Making your own saves money, as store-bought versions can carry hefty price tags.

    Items you will need

    • Large metal or plastic tray
    • Litter or newspaper
    • Baking soda
    • Pee pads
    • Scoop

    Step 1

    Find a metal or plastic tray large enough for your big boy. He needs to have enough room to step onto the litter and turn around comfortably. A tray from the bottom of an old large dog crate might work, or a large plastic storage container. The type that slip under the bed are a good height to hold litter and still allow your big pup to step into easily. Large, trunk-like bins with higher sides can work, so long as you cut a wide notch into one of the sides to serve as an entryway for your pup.

    Step 2

    Choose a filler material that you can change easily and dispose of properly. Many pet stores carry a litter just for dogs, or you can simply use regular cat litter or newspapers. Fill the litter tray with your selected litter and sprinkle baking soda over it to help absorb odors. Lining your tray with commercial pee pads helps hold on to urine and make cleanup as easy as lifting out the wet pad and replacing it with a new one.

    Step 3

    Clean the box every day to keep your dog coming back. A dog's nose is much more sensitive than yours, and even a single pit stop can create enough unpleasant odors to keep your pooch away. Scoop or clean his litter box every day, even multiple times a day, to keep odors down and make the box more inviting to your pup.

    Tips

    • Keep a layer of newspaper around the litter box until you're sure your big boy has it figured out and won't overshoot as he pees.
    • Dog claws can be sharp and cause unintentional damage to the tray over time. Inspect the tray every time you change his litter and replace it if it's looking damaged.

    Warnings

    • Don't rely on the indoor litter box to be your pooch's only bathroom. Take him outside for fresh air and exercise when you can and let him do his business somewhere new.
    • Although you can technically build a litter box for your dog out of wood, odors and moisture would slowly seep into the box over time. No amount of cleaning or scrubbing would remove this stink, so stick with plastic or metal to provide a cleaner bathroom for your pooch.

    About the Author

    Jane Williams began her writing career in 2000 as the writer and editor of a nationwide marketing company. Her articles have appeared on various websites. Williams briefly attended college for a degree in administration before embarking on her writing career.

    Photo Credits

    • Brand X Pictures/Brand X Pictures/Getty Images