How to Make Homemade Dog Treats From Baby Food

Whip up healthy treats your dog will love.

Whip up healthy treats your dog will love.

With the recent rash of recalls on dog food and treats, it's difficult to know what is safe and healthy to purchase for your pup. Purchasing store-bought dog treats can become expensive, especially if you have multiple dogs. Avoid commercially produced treats by making your own simple, nutritious treats at home. Not only will you be giving your dog ingredients that you know are safe and healthy, you'll be saving money as well.

Combine three jars of any meat or vegetable baby food with 1/2 cup uncooked, plain cream of wheat. Stir until the dry ingredient is thoroughly moist and there are no lumps in the dough.

Line a microwave-safe plate with wax paper, and set aside a second sheet of wax paper.

Drop the dough by the spoonful onto the paper-lined plate. Scale the size of the drops to the size of your dog. For example, for a toy breed, make the drops tiny enough to be eaten in one bite. Use the bottom of the spoon to flatten each treat. When the plate is full, cover the treats with the second sheet of wax paper.

Microwave the treats on high for two-and-a-half minutes. Because microwave strengths vary, you may need to heat the treats for an additional 30 seconds.

Allow the treats to cool in the refrigerator, preferably overnight, before serving them to your dog.

Items you will need

  • 3 jars baby food, 2 and 1/2-ounces
  • 1/2 cup uncooked, plain cream of wheat
  • Wax paper

Tip

  • Mix a tablespoon of ground flax seeds or 1/4 cup shredded carrots into the dough to boost the nutritional content of these treats.

Warnings

  • Though they may feel cool on the outside, these treats stay hot on the inside for awhile. If you're unsure if the batch has cooled enough to feed your dog, break one open to test the internal temperature.
  • Avoid baby food that contains any ingredients known to be toxic to dogs, like garlic, grapes, raisins or onions.
  • These treats should not substitute for a balanced, veterinarian-approved diet.
 

Photo Credits

  • Jupiterimages/Photos.com/Getty Images