How to Make a Dog Stop Urinating on an Area

by Melissa McNamara, Demand Media Google
    Lack of housetraining is a possible cause of urine marking.

    Lack of housetraining is a possible cause of urine marking.

    If your dog is urinating in the same spot regularly, he's going to continue the behavior until the smell of urine is eliminated. The key to stopping the behavior is cleanliness, revamping the restricted pee area and altering the dog's natural animal instincts.

    Items you will need

    • Paper towels
    • Newspaper
    • Carpet cleaning machine
    • Enzymatic cleaner
    • Aluminum foil
    • Heavy dish
    • Baking soda
    • Treats
    • Crate (optional)
    • Black-light
    • Chalk or sticky notes
    • Belly band (optional)

    Step 1

    Neuter or spay your dog. Urine is social networking for your dog and tells the neighbor canines “I'm available.” Neutering a male dog eliminates or greatly reduces household urine marking 50 to 60 percent, according to the ASPCA. It can take a few weeks before marking stops. Neuter early to avoid marking behavior patterns, which are learned and difficult to break.

    Step 2

    Clean fresh urine before it soaks into carpet padding. Use paper towels and newspaper to blot urine-soaked carpet until the area is nearly dry. Place the urine-soaked paper towels in the designated potty area to encourage your dog to eliminate in an approved location, recommends the Humane Society of the United States.

    Step 3

    Use a carpet cleaning machine for old stains. Once clean, soak the area with an enzymatic cleaner and allow the area to air dry. Cover the area with aluminum foil and a heavy dish until its completely dry.

    Step 4

    Machine wash urine-stained bedding and rugs. Use a 1 pound box of baking soda with regular detergent and then air dry the items. Once dry, smell the items. If you smell urine, wash the item again with an enzymatic cleaner to breakdown urine odors.

    Step 5

    Place treats or food in areas your dog eliminates. Dogs do not want to eliminate where they eat. If food is in your dog's marking location, he might consider this a food area instead of a place to pee, according to the ASPCA.

    Step 6

    Restrict access to areas your dog urinates. Keep the doors closed, use a baby gate or use a crate.

    Tips

    • Use a black-light to find old urine stains. Turn all the lights off and turn on the black-light—this causes urine spots to glow so you can mark them with chalk or a sticky note.
    • Purchase a belly band for hard to train dogs.

    Warnings

    • Do not punish your dog. Dogs are strongly motivated to mark their territory, so your pup may not be aware of what he's doing, according to the ASPCA. In addition, punishment can cause urinating in a restricted area to increase when you're not home.
    • Do not clean with ammonia-based cleaners since urine contains ammonia. These cleaners can attract your dog to continue urinating in the freshly cleaned area.
    • Avoid steam cleaners since heat permanently sets stain and odors.

    About the Author

    Melissa McNamara is a certified personal trainer who holds a Bachelor of Arts in journalism and communication studies from the University of Iowa. She writes for various health and fitness publications while working toward a Bachelor of Science in nursing.

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