How to Leave Kittens Alone During the Day

They only "look" like little angels until you're gone.

They only "look" like little angels until you're gone.

When it comes to kittens, repeat this mantra to yourself: "Given a chance, kittens will get into trouble." As a pet parent, it's your responsibility to make sure that trouble doesn't end up with a hurt animal, especially when you're not around to take care of him.

Confine the kittens to a single room while you're gone. You're not being mean or putting them in prison, so get over your guilt. Choose a big room and get rid of anything that could harm the kittens, such as glass vases or bottles they can break and then cut themselves on, as well as insect control products, cleaning supplies and certain poisonous plants, such as mistletoe and azaleas. Make the room a safe place to be so you don't have to worry while you're away.

Leave a variety of toys out. A bored kitten is going to get into trouble, so try to keep them as busy as possible when you're not in the house. Toys can be store-bought --such as rubber balls and catnip-scented mice-- or home made. You'd be surprised how much fun a box with a few holes cut on it can be. Even brown paper bags can provide hours of entertainment as the kittens jump in and out of them.

Set food bowls out. Kittens are grazers, so it's a good idea to leave some dry kibble out for them to munch on throughout the day. There are even puzzle toys where you can hide snacks inside, making kittens work for their food.

Move the TV into the room and tune the channel into CATTV.com or the Animal Channel. Just make sure the TV is safely bolted into the wall or placed on a firm piece of furniture, so it's not going to topple over when the kittens get excited by all the virtual birds.

 

About the Author

Tammy Dray has been writing since 1996. She specializes in health, wellness and travel topics and has credits in various publications including Woman's Day, Marie Claire, Adirondack Life and Self. She is also a seasoned independent traveler and a certified personal trainer and nutrition consultant. Dray is pursuing a criminal justice degree at Penn Foster College.

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