How to Housebreak and Train Your Boxer at Home

Start training boxers at a young age and establish yourself as the pack leader.

Start training boxers at a young age and establish yourself as the pack leader.

Boxers, like most dogs, learn best through positive reinforcement and consistency. For a boxer in particular, you'll need to establish dominance early. House-train your boxer confidently and on a frequent training schedule. He will soon become the perfect family pet.

Establish yourself as alpha. You will need to be firm and consistent in all your training efforts with a boxer, but that doesn't mean yelling. Your behavior dictates you're boss. When housebreaking, take your pet out first thing in the morning to the same spot each day. If he eliminates in the house, stay calm but firm and remove him quickly to his designated potty training spot outside. Once you establish dominance, your boxer will become loyal and obedient, making training an easy task.

Reward your boxer every time he successfully completes what you are trying to train him. If you're house-training, give him praise and his favorite toy or a treat every time he eliminates outside. If you're teaching him how to sit, give him a toy or treat each time properly responds to your command. Boxers love exercise, so if you don't have a treat, take your pup for a quick walk or play time as a reward after he relieves himself outside.

Engage your boxer in multiple training sessions per day. For housebreaking, take your pup out in the morning, before bed, after each meal and whenever he wakes up from sleep. If you're training your dog to do tricks, The more training sessions you have, the sooner your dog will catch on.

Items you will need

  • Dog toy or treat

Tip

  • Puppies need to go outside to relieve themselves every 30 to 60 minutes.

Warnings

  • Never punish your boxer if he eliminates in the house. Punishment will make the training experience more stressful for your pup and will cause it to take longer.
  • Cesar Millan and other authorities suggest you don't use commands to encourage your dog to relieve himself. Saying "Go Poop" when you take your dog outside will make him feel rushed or confused, they contend. Remain quiet and patient until he's done doing his thing.
 

About the Author

Courtney McCaffrey graduated from the College of Charleston in 2008 with a B.A. in media studies. She has served as an editor for Blooming Twig Books and the MADA Writing Services publishing company. She is now a writer on various outdoor sports such as snowboarding, skiing, surfing and bodysurfing.

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