Homemade Low-Fat Dog Food

by Carolyn Barton, Demand Media
    You can feed low fat without leaving your dog hungry.

    You can feed low fat without leaving your dog hungry.

    If your dog is overweight or suffers from pancreatitis, a low-fat diet is essential. Most prescription low-fat dog foods are expensive and might contain things you would not want to feed your pet. Making your own food is convenient, easy and gives you the control over what she eats.

    Items you will need

    • Lean ground beef
    • Beef kidney
    • Kale
    • Yellow crookneck squash
    • Oatmeal
    • Chicken breasts
    • Kidney beans
    • Black beans
    • Carrots
    • Tomato paste
    • Chicken broth

    Ground Beef Recipe

    Step 1

    Boil one cup of lean ground beef until it is brown all the way through. Drain and rinse to remove any grease. Trim the fat from 1/2 cup of beef kidney and boil until it is evenly brown. Overcooking will make it rubbery. Drain and set aside.

    Step 2

    Boil 1/4 cup kale and 1/2 cup yellow crookneck squash until soft.

    Step 3

    Combine meat and vegetables in a large bowl. Add 3/4 cup uncooked oatmeal and mix together until well blended. Allow the mixture to cool slightly and give to your dog in three to four portions throughout the day.

    Doggie Chili

    Step 1

    Remove the fat from four chicken breasts and dice them into small pieces. Place them in a nonstick pan over medium heat and cook until they are white all the way through.

    Step 2

    Pour in one cup of drained kidney beans, one cup of drained black beans and one cup of diced carrots. Add 1/2 cup tomato paste and four cups of chicken broth.

    Step 3

    Cook over medium heat for 10 minutes. Turn off heat and allow the chili to cool slightly. This recipe makes enough to feed her for up to five days, depending on her size.

    Tip

    • Most combinations of lean meats and dog-preferred vegetables, along with brown rice, will provide a good low-fat meal.

    Warning

    • Avoid adding onion or garlic to a recipe when cooking for your dog. Both are potentially toxic to canines.

    About the Author

    Carolyn Barton has an associate degree in business management from Seminole Community College and has been writing professionally since 2007. Her articles have appeared on websites such as Firehouse.com. She specializes in website content and ghostwrites for several private clients. She is currently pursuing a bachelor's degree in journalism.

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