What Is the Easiest Dog to Housebreak?

by Adrienne Farricelli, Demand Media Google
    I promise I won't poop on the carpet, deal?

    I promise I won't poop on the carpet, deal?

    If you are serious about adding a canine companion to your nest but are worried about your carpets getting decorated with yellow and brown polka dots, you may be looking for a solution. Your home will thank you if you do some research to find the easiest pooches to housebreak.

    The Right Source

    If you want a dog that is easy to housebreak, skip the pet store or backyard breeder. These dogs are often left in cages all day or will go potty just about anywhere and anytime. If you purchase your puppy from a reputable breeder, your chances for a smoother housebreaking process are higher. Starting at around 3 weeks of age, good breeders divide the puppy's nest into distinct areas specifically designed for eliminating, eating, playing and sleeping. As a result, many of the easiest puppies to housebreak come from reputable breeders because they will more likely see their crate as a comfy bedroom rather than a bathroom.

    The Right Breed

    If you find the housebreaking process intimidating, you may want to steer clear of most of the breeds in the toy category. While it is true you do not need a shovel or an industrial mop to clean up their messes, their tiny bladders will cause them to repeatedly awaken you in the middle of the night and wee morning hours so to go outside. "House training failure is the leading cause of small dogs losing their homes" explains Kathy Diamond Davis, a therapy dog handler and trainer and author of the book "Therapy Dogs: Training Your Dog to Reach Others". Some of the top easiest breeds to housebreak include Boston terriers, poodles, Dobermans, shiba-inu, shar-pei and some other Japanese and Norwegian breeds according to The Canine Information Library.

    The Right Age

    You can really teach a dog old tricks; generally, the older the dog, the better his ability to control his bladder and bowel. Adult dogs are indeed much easier and quicker to house train when compared to puppies, especially when you invest in a crate. If you get your dog from a shelter, you may get lucky and get an already house trained dog. However, keep in mind that adult dogs who were housebroken in their previous homes will most likely need a refresher course if they weren't taken regularly on walks while they were at the shelter, according to Dog Time.

    The Right Owner

    The easiest dog to housebreak is also the dog blessed with a knowledgeable and patient owner. If you are up to the challenge, you will help set Scruffy up for success by cleaning messes appropriately, providing reliable feeding and elimination routines, applying gentle training methods and setting realistic expectations. If you are away for most of the day, it would be unfair to expect your puppy or dog to learn potty training without guidance and opportunities to be taken outside. Vigilance, patience, commitment, consistency and time can really make a difference on how easy or difficult the process of housebreaking your dog will turn out to be.

    About the Author

    Adrienne Farricelli has been a writer since 2005, serving as an editor, steward and writer for several online publications. She brings expertise in canine topics, previously working with the American Animal Hospital Association and receiving certification as a dog trainer from the Certification Council for Professional Dog Trainers. Farricelli offers reward-based training and behavior consults at Rover's Ranch Home Boarding and Training.

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