Do-It-Yourself Dog Wash Shops

Bathing your dog can be fun experience if your dog takes to water. But if the mere thought of getting a paw moist strikes fear in the heart of your pooch, it's more like a nightmare. Fortunately, dog "washaterias" are popping up everywhere, so you can walk in, wash up and wag out.

Convenience

Schlepping a dog into a nice clean bathroom, then hoisting her into your sparkling clean bathtub, is not for the meek. In fact, it can make you postpone your dog's grooming routine to the point where you can smell her 15 minutes after she's left the room. Washing your dog at home can leave clogged drains, muddy bathtub rings, dirty towels and a soaking wet floor. With a bumper crop of do-it-yourself shops catering to dog lovers everywhere, there's no worries about making a mess. Even better, you don't have to clean up after the fact.

The Basics

Step into your neighborhood do-it-yourself dog wash salon and you'll find stainless or fiberglass tubs outfitted with flexible hoses with spray heads, which make it much easier to thoroughly clean and rinse your dog. The tubs are often waist-high or walk-in, either of which makes it easier to scrub your dog while saving your back. If you're afraid your dog will bolt, consider a tub that incorporates restraint systems and rubber mats to keep your dog safe and secure.

Necessities

Don't worry about bringing your dog's own shampoo -- although you probably can if you want -- because DIY dog wash salons typically offer professional coat conditioners, shampoos and even spa colognes to make your dog shiny and smell delicious. Everything you need to pamper your pooch, including scrubbers, ear wipes and nail clippers, is generally there for the asking. And leave your guest towels at home -- you'll find towels, blow-dryers and maybe even a drying cage or two, plus slicker brushes and combs to provide your pooch with all the finishing touches.

Affordability

Time is money, and washing your dog yourself in an environment you can simply walk away from without having to clean up is a time-saver. Pricing is generally based upon the size of your dog; after all, it takes much less space, time, water and product to wash a Chihuahua than it does a rottweiler. A high cost of living where you live or higher operating expenses for the shop's owner may affect pricing. Many self-serve salons offer such promotions as a two-for-one specials, coupons and rewards programs for repeat customers.

 

References

  • Starting and Running a Do-It-Yourself Dogwash; Doug Gelbert