What Dogs Have Oily Coats?

by Joe Gordon, Demand Media
    Some dogs are water-resistant.

    Some dogs are water-resistant.

    Maybe you've noticed that your dog's hair seems excessively oily, causing you concern. The fact is, many dogs bred to swim have developed natural oily coats to repel water. So set aside the Head and Shoulders -- your Godiva may be related to one of these popular water dogs.

    Newfoundland Dogs

    The Newfoundland dog is a powerful long-distance swimming champ, with true lifesaving instincts. He always wears an XL fleecy undercoat for warmth, and a heavy oily outer coat to protect him from the icy Newfoundland waters. The Newfoundland has webbed feet and prefers the breast stroke over a common dog paddle. Have you checked your little girl’s feet for webbing?

    Alaskan Malamute

    Considered the Rocky Balboa of the Arctic sled dog class, the Alaskan malamute possesses herculean strength and endurance. Dressed in his signature coarse, thick outer coat, and sensible oily, woolly undercoat, this boy is prepared for both long distance swimming and cross-country sled hauling. Malamutes usually don a shorter, less dense coat during those summer months at the seashore.

    Chesapeake Bay Retriever

    Distinguished as the state dog of Maryland and developed along the Chesapeake Bay, the Chesapeake Bay retriever is considered by many to be the toughest dog in the water retriever class. This muscular, medium-sized scrapper is famous for his courage, work ethic and love of water. He is also known for his distinctive outerwear, comprised of a short, wavy outer coat and a dense woolly undercoat, both containing natural oils to handle the harsh Chesapeake conditions.

    Labrador Retriever

    Active, but calm, and obedient when properly trained, the Labrador retriever lists swimming and retrieving as his favorite outdoor activities. Incorporating a short, dense, oily outer coat over a thick, soft undercoat, this handsome boy's unique fur is both water-repellent and soil resistant. Now that's wash-and-wear! Like his cousin the Newfoundland, the Labrador has webbing between his toes to glide through the water and snowshoe in winter conditions.

    About the Author

    Joe Gordon is a writer who divides his time between Tampa Bay, Florida and Western North Carolina. Gordon has been published in local and regional newspapers and magazines, including VisitFlorida.org, "Oceanfront Magazine," "Sarasota Herald Tribune," "The Bradenton Herald," "Sarasota Scene Magazine," " Biz 941 Magazine" and "U Manatee Magazine." He studied journalism at Ohio University.

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