Dog Gates That Allow Cats

Sure, they're pals now ... but sometimes, they need a barrier between them.

Sure, they're pals now ... but sometimes, they need a barrier between them.

Sometimes Fritzie needs to get away to her own space. When Trotter is hot on her tail, that's next to impossible. What your cat needs is a dog gate that keeps her canine brother in one part of the house while allowing her to escape to some peace and quiet.

Basic Gate

Basic gates that are adjustable to fit into a variety of doorway widths are typically no taller than 1 1/2 to 2 feet high -- about the same height as most baby gates. That measurement is a piece of cake for Fritzi; she'll clear it in a single bound when she feels the urgent need to make a getaway. She'll find it equally effortless to hop back over once she's finished with her quiet alone time.

Gate With a Kitty Door

Recognizing the need to accommodate different sizes of pets, some dog gate makers are now manufacturing versions of their gates with kitty doors built right in. Usually the opening Fritzi will frequent is found in one of the bottom corners of the gate. Some have a flap like the cat access on your back door, while others have a small door on a hinge that your kitty can push open. They're ideal if you have a large dog, but smaller dogs will be able to get through the kitty door with ease. These gates also have the option of locking the cat door, allowing you to keep Fritzi away from Trotter if she's the one who tends to instigate their battles.

Wide Bars, Slightly Raised

Some of the gates built for the big breeds, such as great Danes and Pyrenees, have the bars spaced farther apart than gates built for smaller dogs. Unless she's packed on a few pounds, Fritzi will have no problem simply walking between the bars that keep Trotter on his side of the gate. Other gates are built to fit just above the baseboard, providing a space that your kitty can crawl under but that medium and large dogs won't be able to get through.

Kitty Escape

Cat escape gates are useful for the feline-canine mixed households, but only if the canine half isn't a small or toy breed. These gates are often constructed of wood to lend an aesthetic look to your home and include an opening along the bottom of the gate through which Fritzi can make a quick escape if she feels threatened. Because it has no locking door, she'll be free to come and go from one side to the other as the mood strikes.

 

About the Author

Elle Di Jensen has been a writer and editor since 1990. She began working in the fitness industry in 1987, and her experience includes editing and publishing a workout manual. She has an extended family of pets, including special needs animals. Jensen attended Idaho and Boise State Universities. Her work has appeared in various print and online publications.

Photo Credits

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