How to Cure Whining Dogs in a Car

A barrier may help your whining dog feel safe.

A barrier may help your whining dog feel safe.

Whining in the car is a natural habit for some dogs. Dogs whine for a number of reasons, including excitement, fear and even the occasional bout of motion sickness. However, a whining pooch doesn’t have to ruin your ride; a little extra attention will keep her quite until you reach your destination.

Place the dog in his crate, or fit him with a seat belt harness before disembarking on your trip. It may seem silly, but if there was an accident, your dog could be injured or killed if not properly restrained. Confining him also offers him a feeling of security, which may minimize whining on the road.

Stay calm in the car. It seems like common sense, but the more nervous you are, the more likely your furry friend is to whine. If you get nervous or distressed while driving, turn on your favorite calming music to lighten the mood.

Give the dog his favorite toy to keep him occupied in the vehicle. Whining is also a symptom of boredom, and the distraction of a fun toy will help keep your pooch quiet in the car.

Teach your dog a quiet command to alleviate whining in the car. Put the dog in the car, and sit in the driver’s seat. Hold a few treats in your hand, and as soon as he starts to whine. tell him to “hush” in a firm voice. When he quiets down, praise him and give him a treat. The magic of the quiet command only works if the dog knows he gets a treat for being quiet, so you must reward him the instant he quiets down. If the dog continues to whine, ignore him for a few seconds and give the command again, rewarding him only when he stops whining.

Consult your veterinarian if the dog drools excessively or vomits in the car. Some dogs whine due to an upset tummy caused by motion sickness, and your vet may prescribe an anti-nausea medication to calm his tummy.

Items you will need

  • Crate or seat belt harness
  • Toys
  • Treats
  • Anti-nausea medication

Warning

  • Never give your dog any medications not prescribed by your vet.
 

About the Author

Louise Lawson has been a published author and editor for more than 10 years. Lawson specializes in pet and food-related articles, utilizing her 15 years as a sous chef and as a dog breeder, handler and trainer to produce pieces for online and print publications.

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