How to Cure a Smelly Dog's Coat

by Louise Lawson, Demand Media
    Stinky dogs need proper grooming.

    Stinky dogs need proper grooming.

    A smelly dog is no one’s best friend. Your playful pooch may small for a variety of reasons, including a good roll in something dead, or fecal and urine buildup in her coat. Curing your smelly dog may take a little elbow grease, but you’ll both be much happier.

    Items you will need

    • Blunt-tipped scissors
    • Dog brush
    • Baking soda
    • Dry shampoo wipes
    • Dog shampoo
    • Dog conditioner

    Step 1

    Check your dog carefully for signs of itching and infection. Smelliness is often a result of skin infection, which will look like a red, irritated spot under her coat. Lift the hair with your hands to get a close look at the skin, and trim away long hair to make it easier to treat the spot.

    Step 2

    Take your pup to the vet if you notice any abnormal skin conditions. He may perform a scraping to determine the source of the infection and prescribe medication to clear up the spot. Ear infections are also a potential source of funky odor, so ask your vet to take a quick peek to eliminate her ears as the source of the stink; her anal glands may be impacted and need to be manually drained, something your vet can show you how to do.

    Step 3

    Brush your dog thoroughly to remove dead hair. Lift her tail and comb away any caked-on feces, and trim away any big clumps with a pair of blunt-tipped scissors. Snip the hair under her tail short to prevent future clumps to cut down on offensive doggy smells.

    Step 4

    Restrict her access to potentially smelly spots in your yard. Fence off garden spaces to keep her from rolling in fertilizer, and scan your yard daily for feces and dead things she might be tempted to roll in.

    Step 5

    Sprinkle your smelly pooch with baking soda. This natural product is a scent-busting powerhouse and will soak up smells before they have a chance to offend your delicate senses. Spread a little soda over your dog’s coat and brush it in with a soft brush.

    Step 6

    Wipe the dog down with a waterless shampoo wipe. These handy little cloths look like baby wipes, but are coated with a special dry shampoo that kills odor without the need for a full bath. Wipe the dog’s entire body, including the area under her tail, to leave her coat clean and free of invasive odor.

    Step 7

    Bathe your dog to bust any lingering smells. Frequent bathing can cause skin irritation, so bathe your pooch only when you can no longer stand the stink. Wet her down and pour on a handful of dog shampoo. Work it into her coat with both hands, rinse and add a little conditioner for softness and shine.

    Warning

    • Don’t use perfume or odor-eliminating sprays on your dog. They may mask odor for a little while, but they aren’t made for dogs and may cause serious skin problems.

    About the Author

    Louise Lawson has been a published author and editor for more than 10 years. Lawson specializes in pet and food-related articles, utilizing her 15 years as a sous chef and as a dog breeder, handler and trainer to produce pieces for online and print publications.

    Photo Credits

    • Jupiterimages/Photos.com/Getty Images