How to Cure a French Bulldog's Itchy Skin

by Brenna Davis, Demand Media
    French bulldogs can suffer from several skin ailments.

    French bulldogs can suffer from several skin ailments.

    French bulldogs are predisposed to a number of skin problems, and an itchy dog can keep you up all night with her persistent licking and scratching. There are several remedies that can give your dog relief, but skin problems should always prompt a trip to the veterinarian.

    Items you will need

    • Benadryl
    • Oatmeal bath
    • Hot spot medication

    Step 1

    Give your dog 1 mg of Benadryl per pound of body weight. Benadryl will not solve the underlying skin problem, but will give your dog temporary relief until you can get to the veterinarian.

    Step 2

    Take your dog to the vet. Your veterinarian will examine your dog's skin and take a thorough history to determine potential causes. Allergic reactions, fleas, skin infections and endocrine system disorders can all cause skin problems. Your veterinarian may recommend medication, diet changes or home remedies to alleviate the itching. It can take some medications a few days to work, so try some itching home remedies -- with your veterinarian's permission -- to give your dog immediate relief.

    Step 3

    Give your dog an oatmeal bath. Oatmeal has soothing properties that can alleviate itching due to a variety of skin problems. Rinse your dog in warm water, then thoroughly scrub her skin and coat. You can give her two to three oatmeal baths per week until the skin problem clears up.

    Step 4

    Apply a topical hot spot medication to any hot spots your dog has created by scratching. French bulldogs can be particularly persistent in scratching itches, and hot spots increase itching. Relieving the hot spot pain will decrease itchiness and future hot spots until the skin problems go away.

    Tip

    • Give your dog any medications your veterinarian prescribes according to the package instructions. If you stop giving a dog an antibiotic too soon, for example, the itching may return.

    References

    About the Author

    Brenna Davis is a professional writer who covers parenting, pets, health and legal topics. Her articles have appeared in a variety of newspapers and magazines as well as on websites. She is a court-appointed special advocate and is certified in crisis counseling and child and infant nutrition. She holds degrees in developmental psychology and philosophy from Georgia State University.

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