Do Corgis Need to Get Haircuts?

Per AKC regulations, only corgi feet and whiskers can be trimmed for show.

Per AKC regulations, only corgi feet and whiskers can be trimmed for show.

Long-haired pups who do not shed fur need haircuts so they won't look unkempt. Since corgis have medium-length hair, they don't need to visit the groomer. You'll still want to bathe and brush these pooches, but their grooming needs are fairly low maintenance.

Significance

A relatively short-haired breed, corgis do not need to be trimmed. In fact, only corgi feet and whiskers can be trimmed for show, per American Kennel Club regulation. So-called fluffy corgis have longer feathered fur that gives them an overall fluffy appearance. These pups cannot be groomed for show either. If your corgi won't show, you can clip his fur to keep it shorter -- but it isn't necessary.

Regular Grooming

By combing out your corgi regularly, you remove loose hair and stimulate hair growth. A greyhound comb, which has both medium and coarse tines, works well. Begin with the coarse tines; this loosens up the dead fur. After you comb your pup with the coarse tines, switch to the medium comb. Finish up with a fine-toothed comb. Comb from the rear leg up toward your pup's face. Aim for weekly grooming at minimum.

Trimming Ear and Feet Fur

Use pet shears to blend the long hair at the base of the ears with the shorter hair. Corgi ears can get quite fluffy so blending the ear hair in with the neck hair gives your pal a clean-cut appearance. Feet trimming isn't necessary, but gives your friend's fuzzy feet a sleeker look. Use scissors to clean up the hairs peeking between his pads and shape your friend's feet.

Warning

Do not shave -- or ask a groomer to shave -- your pet corgi. Corgis have a double coat that offers protection from the sun's rays. A shaved corgi could get sunburn. Brushing and scissor snipping won't harm the double coat, but shaving may irreparably damage your pup's coat. If the hair follicles are damaged from shaving, the fur may not grow back and your corgi may have bald patches.

 

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