Cat Foods That Reduce Flatulence

Cat foods with high grain content will cause flatulence in cats.

Cat foods with high grain content will cause flatulence in cats.

It's embarrassing when flatulent Fluffy passes gas and blames it on you. In a roundabout way, though, she might be right. Although you aren't the source of the smell, you do control what she eats. If you're feeding her the right kind of food, she won't be a gassy furball.

High Protein

Cats of all sizes from lions on down to your housecat are built to eat meat. Protein is what they digest most efficiently. If Fluffy has a problem with gas, shop for a different brand of cat food, one that has a higher protein content than the one you're feeding her. When you're reading the label, make sure that the source of protein is a quality one. Look for simple, recognizable ingredients like chicken, beef, salmon or even duck, and choose a food that lists meat as the first ingredient.

Low Grain

Sometimes cat food manufacturers use grains as fillers. It helps with the texture and consistency of dry food and it keeps production costs down. But since your cat runs most efficiently on protein from meat, she doesn't need carbohydrates from grains. Trying to digest a high level of grains will cause gas, so feed Fluffy a cat food that has very little grain content.

Skip the Soy

Soy is high in protein and, according to "The Doctor's Book of Home Remedies for Dogs and Cats," some cat foods contain up to 25 percent soy to help boost the protein content. Alas, soy is one more food that cats find difficult to digest, and that results in flatulence. Go for cat foods that have a low soy content or that contain no soy at all.

Avoid the Veggies

Vegetarian diets are a trend that don't sit well with Fluffy, and she'll show it by producing gas. Even humans sometimes have a hard time digesting veggies, so it should be no surprise that your protein-eating cat won't be able to digest them, especially if they're raw. Vegetables such as broccoli, tomatoes, spinach and cucumbers cause bloating, gas and general sluggishness. Even if you've gone vegan, have sympathy for your cat and feed her food that skips the vegetables and is heavy on the meat-based protein. Your air quality isn't the only thing that will improve: cats without meat in their diets will become ill and may even die.

 

About the Author

Elle Di Jensen has been a writer and editor since 1990. She began working in the fitness industry in 1987, and her experience includes editing and publishing a workout manual. She has an extended family of pets, including special needs animals. Jensen attended Idaho and Boise State Universities. Her work has appeared in various print and online publications.

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