How to Care for Newborn Beagle Puppies in Cold Weather

Beagles are medium-sized, short-haired dogs that are not well-equipped for extreme temperatures.

Beagles are medium-sized, short-haired dogs that are not well-equipped for extreme temperatures.

Most wild animals are naturally programmed to have their young in the spring and summer so newborn animals will not have to struggle to survive in cold temperatures or when food is in short supply. If your beagle produces a litter of pups while its snowing, you may have to help her care for them to ensure their survival. Puppies are at their most vulnerable when they are newborns.

Create a warm nest of blankets and towels for your mother dog and puppies. Build the nest indoors where they will be protected from the elements and the heat can be controlled. Beagle puppies do not have thick fur coats to protect them from the cold, and the mother only can do so much to keep her pups warm. Try to handle the pups as little as possible as you move them. If the mother dog is not familiar with you, she may react aggressively when you attempt to handle the pups. If the mother becomes aggressive, you will need to restrain her while you move the puppies to their new location.

Provide your mother dog with plenty of dry dog food and water. Do not worry about her overeating. She will need to produce plenty of milk for the puppies as well as burn enough calories to keep herself warm in the chilly temperatures. Allow your mother dog to nurse her puppies until they are approximately 6 weeks old. Provide the puppies with plenty of small bite puppy chow and water as they begin to wean.

Do not allow the puppies outdoors for more than a few minutes in cold weather. Very young beagle puppies have almost no protection from the snow and could freeze if left outside. Use puppy pads or newspapers to provide a place indoors for your puppies to go to the bathroom.

Items you will need

  • Blankets
  • Towels
  • Dog food
  • Puppy food
  • Puppy pads

Tip

  • Make sure to keep your puppies warm when you take them to the veterinarian for their first shots. Do not leave puppies alone in a car.
 

About the Author

Jen Davis has been writing since 2004. She has served as a newspaper reporter and her freelance articles have appeared in magazines such as "Horses Incorporated," "The Paisley Pony" and "Alabama Living." Davis earned her Bachelor of Arts in communication with a concentration in journalism from Berry College in Rome, Ga.

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