How Often Can You Give Your Bichon Poo a Bath?

by D.H. Blandings, Demand Media
    This guy needs a professional.

    This guy needs a professional.

    The bichon poo is a mixed breed dog of bichon and poodle extraction. Although there are many varieties of each, these breeds all share a reputation for not shedding. This may be a bonus for some, but their hair doesn't stop growing the way coats of other breeds do, so it needs to be clipped more frequently. Grooming these dogs is often left to professionals. However, if you prefer to bathe your bichon poo at home, ever four to six weeks will suffice.

    Brushing Before Bathing

    Regularly brush your dog to remove dirt, tangles and other unwanted matter, such as burrs. It also helps distribute the pup's natural oils evenly across his coat, contributing to healthy skin. Typically, a bichon poo requires trimming every four to six weeks, but if you are just brushing, use a metal comb and a soft slicker. Remove all mats and tangles before the bath, as these are more difficult to get out of a wet coat.

    Skin Conditions to Watch For

    Grooming your bichon poo before bathing provides a good opportunity to check his fur for signs of fleas or lice, ticks and skin ailments such as hot spots or allergic dermatitis, which is common in young poodles. Fleas and lice can be treated with medicated shampoo, but a consult a veterinary professional about skin rashes of any kind.

    Choosing the Right Products

    Experts recommend steering clear of using human hair products and household cleaners to wash your dog. When selecting products, look for natural botanicals free of harsh chemicals. Most pets respond well to tear-free dog shampoos, but if you're concerned about a skin condition or just can't decide, consult your vet about the best products for your bichon poo's coat.

    Proper Bathing Techniques

    If everything checks out with your dog's skin, it's bath time for pooch! The kitchen or basement sink will do, but use the bathtub if you prefer. Gently spray your bichon poo all over with warm water, being careful to avoid the eyes and ears, which should be washed separately. Lather him evenly, paying special attention to the dirtiest parts: the face, the paws and the rear end. Rinse thoroughly, towel dry and finish with a gentle blow dry.

    References

    • Kristin Melhus-Roe, ed., The Dog Bible
    • James DeBitetto and Sarah Hodgson, You and Your Puppy

    About the Author

    D.H. Blandings is a writer and award-nominated editor based in Ottawa, Canada. Working mainly in the corporate sector, she also writes about species at risk for a local not-for-profit animal sanctuary. She has degrees from the University of Toronto and Concordia University, and is pursuing a publishing certificate at Ryerson University.

    Photo Credits

    • Chris Amaral/Digital Vision/Getty Images