Can I Feed a Fancy Goldfish Grapes?

Grapes are healthy for fancy goldfish when fed in small quantities.

Grapes are healthy for fancy goldfish when fed in small quantities.

Fancy goldfish can subsist on flake food, but they thrive when they have a varied diet. These omnivorous scavengers will eat almost anything, but the fact that a goldfish will eat something does not mean it is safe. In small quantities, grapes can be a healthy addition to your goldfish's diet.

Basic Goldfish Diet

Fancy goldfish will readily eat just about any food, including sweets and other unhealthy items. However, their diet should be limited to fish food, plant matter and whole proteins such as brine shrimp and bloodworms. Goldfish should eat slightly more vegetables than protein, and fruit should be limited to snacks.

Benefits of Grapes

Grapes are high in vitamins A, C and B6, as well as calcium. These nutrients offer similar benefits to goldfish as to people and can reduce your fish's risk of some diseases in addition to improving overall health. Soft, sweet fruits such as grapes are particularly appealing to goldfish, and most fish will readily eat them.

Risks of Grapes

In large quantities, grapes can cause intestinal problems such as a runny stool. Grapes also pose a choking hazard, particularly to small goldfish, so owners should ensure grapes are chopped.

How to Feed

Give your goldfish one grape per fish two to three times per week. Peel the grapes to remove the skin, then chop the grapes into fish pellet-sized pieces. If your fish do not eat the grapes, try feeding a smaller quantity next time. If your fish still won't eat grapes, try a different fruit such as blueberries or raspberries.

 

About the Author

Brenna Davis is a professional writer who covers parenting, pets, health and legal topics. Her articles have appeared in a variety of newspapers and magazines as well as on websites. She is a court-appointed special advocate and is certified in crisis counseling and child and infant nutrition. She holds degrees in developmental psychology and philosophy from Georgia State University.

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