Benefits of Liquid Vitamins for Cats

Numerous vitamins are required for proper health.

Numerous vitamins are required for proper health.

Liquid vitamins are easy to administer, are more readily absorbed by the body than pills and often come in pleasant flavors. Using liquid vitamins can help ensure a cat gets the full spectrum of vitamins, which are not always present in the diet.

Why Add Liquid Vitamins to a Cat's Diet?

Like humans, cats don't always get a full range of vitamins on a regular basis. With 13 essential vitamins to cover, adding them can ensure that a cat is getting everything she needs. Vitamins play key roles in the body's functioning and are truly essential to health. Some cat foods are fortified, but if not -- or if a cat is deficient or otherwise in need of supplementation -- a vet or can help determine if vitamins are needed.

Optimizing Digestion

Pills must dissolve before the body can absorb and use them. They don't always dissolve entirely. When that happens, a cat won't get the entire dose provided in the pill. Liquid vitamins overcome this challenge. With no dissolving required, liquid vitamins quickly go to work in a cat's body and don't run the risk of exiting the body without being digested.

Increasing Chances of Ingestion

Most cat parents can attest to the futility of trying to feed a cat something she's not in the mood for. Unlike many dogs, who will scarf down pills camouflaged in peanut butter, cream cheese or another fave -- cats are much more discerning. You can administer liquid vitamins directly into a cat's mouth or mixed in his food.

Administration Tips

Administering vitamins directly by mouth ensures she gets the entire dose. To give vitamins orally, fill a dropper with the required dose. Administer liquid into the pouch area between the cat's teeth and cheek. Hold his mouth closed and stroke his neck or gently blow at his nose to encourage swallowing. Liquids can enter the windpipe and cause choking, so in addition to squirting liquids in the pouch area only, also avoid tilting the cat's head back.

 

About the Author

Sarah Whitman's work has been featured in newspapers, magazines, websites and informational booklets. She is currently pursuing a master's degree in nutrition, and her projects feature nutrition and cooking, whole foods, supplements and organics. She also specializes in companion animal health, encouraging the use of whole foods, supplements and other holistic approaches to pet care.

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