The Behavior of Cockapoos

by Jane Meggitt, Demand Media Google
    Cockapoos are half poodle.

    Cockapoos are half poodle.

    Cockapoo lovers believe these dogs combine the best qualities of the parent breeds—cocker spaniels and poodles. Poodle ancestry provides the cockapoo with a non-shedding coat, while the spaniel half allows a variety of color mixes, including bi- and tri-colored cockapoos.

    Temperament

    Bred as companion dogs, cockapoos possess affection in abundance, along with a smart, willing temperament. Loyal and eager to please, this cross truly becomes your best friend. He makes a great family dog as well, and gets along well with other dogs and pets. Even as a grown dog, your cockapoo retains puppy-like qualities that appeal to all dog lovers.

    Training

    Although the cockapoo is a friendly dog who wants to please, dogs need basic training to keep them on their best behavior. You may want to enroll in some basic dog obedience classes with your cockapoo. Well-trained dogs know how to walk properly on a leash, come when called and know basic commands such as "sit" and "stay." Training isn't just good for your dog's mind and well-being; it helps create a bond between the two of you.

    Exercise

    Cockapoos require only moderate amounts of exercise, so this is a cross that can probably match your own energy levels. Your cockapoo can be a couch potato or a dog who loves to accompany his owner on runs through the park or woods. His primary interest is spending time with you, so watching TV by your side or taking a long walk are both fine with him. However, like people, all dogs need some level of exercise to stay healthy and fit.

    Care

    Dogs are what they eat. Keep your cockapoo healthy by feeding him a high-quality dog food. Take him to the vet regularly for checkups, and keep him on a schedule for heartworm prevention treatment and flea and tick control. If you notice negative changes in his behavior, such as lethargy or depression, take him to the vet. He may have an underlying illness causing behavioral changes. Cockapoos, noted for longevity, can be companions for 15 years or more.

    About the Author

    Jane Meggitt has been a writer for more than 20 years. In addition to reporting for a major newspaper chain, she has been published in "Horse News," "Suburban Classic," "Hoof Beats," "Equine Journal" and other publications. She has a Bachelor of Arts in English from New York University and an Associate of Arts from the American Academy of Dramatics Arts, New York City.

    Photo Credits